Women account for a higher proportion of drink-drivers in the regions. (File picture)
Women account for a higher proportion of drink-drivers in the regions. (File picture)

Our female drink-driving hot spots

ABOUT 13,000 women have been caught drink-driving across Queensland over the past two years.

While men are the main offenders, with police catching 45,239 males drunk behind the wheel, women make up a quarter of offenders.

And women in regional centres are more likely to drink-drive than women in Brisbane.

Cairns has the highest level of female offenders, with 37.2 per cent of tickets going to women.

The Sunshine Coast (29.5 per cent), Gold Coast (24.3 per cent), Townsville (23.6 per cent and Bundaberg (23.5 per cent) also recorded high rates of female offenders.

In Brisbane, only 21.2 per cent of drink-drivers were female.

Queensland drivers are more likely to blow a blood-alcohol level of .05 to .10 per cent.

Road trauma expert Professor Kerry Armstrong said "sociological factors" meant women were more at risk of drink-driving now than in the past.

Women account for a higher proportion of drink-drivers in the regions. (File picture)
Women account for a higher proportion of drink-drivers in the regions. (File picture)

"The numbers are likely to be increasing because women are more likely to have access to their own money and they often live in multi-vehicle households so they are more mobile," said the research fellow at QUT's Centre for Accident Research and Road Safety - Queensland.

"And part of it is that women may be inadvertently caught out early in the morning after drinking as they take kids to school or other activities."

The Queensland Government will spend $1.765 billion this financial year on alcohol, drug and mental health services across the state.

"Of all drugs, alcohol remains a leading cause of risky behaviours, deaths, injuries, disease and other health concerns across Queensland," a Queensland Health spokesperson said.

"Alcohol is also the most common principal drug of concern among people who seek treatment.

"Excessive alcohol consumption can put people in danger of being killed or seriously injured due to impaired perception, decision making, coordination and reaction times."

Queensland Road Policing Command Assistant Commissioner Mike Keating said a quarter of people who died in traffic crashes over the past 10 years had an excess amount of alcohol in their blood.

"We have seen improvements over time but we also have seen that some people are not getting the message to not drink and drive," Mr Keating said.

"The message is simple - if you are going out to have a drink, have a plan B."

BY THE NUMBERS

Drink-driving rates by gender across Queensland in 2016-2018

REGION | MALE | FEMALE

BRISBANE 78.9%, 21.1%

BUNDABERG 76.5%, 23.5%

CAIRNS 62.8%, 37.2%

FRASER COAST 77.7%, 22.3%

GOLD COAST 75.7%, 24.3%

GLADSTONE 87.6%, 12.4%

GYMPIE 80.2%, 19.8%

IPSWICH 80.2%, 19.8%

MACKAY 77.2%, 22.8%

ROCKHAMPTON 78%, 22%

SUNSHINE COAST 70.5%, 29.5%

TOOWOOMBA 78%, 22%

TOWNSVILLE 76.4% ,23.6%

WARWICK 82.8%, 17.2%

QUEENSLAND 77.7%, 22.3%

Source: Queensland Police Service



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