Wildlife officers and police are continuing investigating the suspicious death of a two metre freshwater crocodile in Lake Moondarra, near Mt Isa in early August. (Picture: North West Star)
Wildlife officers and police are continuing investigating the suspicious death of a two metre freshwater crocodile in Lake Moondarra, near Mt Isa in early August. (Picture: North West Star)

What happened to the croc’s head?

WILDLIFE officers are investigating reports of two deceased crocodiles found at separate locations on the banks of the Herbert River.

A three-metre crocodile carcass has been reportedly found partially buried on a sand bar near Gowrie Creek and a four-metre crocodile has been found nearby decapitated.

The Department of Environment and Science cannot confirm the cause of deaths at this stage of the investigation.

"The investigations into the deceased crocodiles near the Herbert River are still in the very early stages and causes of death are yet to be determined," the spokeswoman said.

The reports of the dead crocodiles at the Herbert River followed an investigation into a two-metre crocodile found without a head at Lake Moondarra, near Mount Isa in early August.

Acting manager of northern wildlife operations Dr Matthew Brien at the time said a member of the public saw the body of a headless freshwater crocodile and reported it to the Department of Environment.

"All reports of crocodiles, deceased or alive, should be made to the Department of Environment and Science as soon as possible in order to assist wildlife officers with their investigations and as a matter of public safety," he said. "It is against the law to kill crocodiles in Queensland."

The Department of Environment and Science spokeswoman said all reports of crocodiles, deceased or alive, should be made to the department by calling 1300 130 372.

"If a reported animal was found to pose a threat to human safety it would be targeted for removal by trained professionals," she said. "On average it takes the Department of Environment and Science less than eight days to remove a problem crocodile from an area."

The spokeswoman said the Herbert River was a known crocodile habitat and people in the area were reminded to always be crocwise.

"In particular expect crocodiles in all northern Queensland waterways even if there is no warning sign present and obey all warning signs - they are there to keep you safe," she said. "Be aware crocs also swim in the ocean and be extra cautious around water at night and stay well away from crocodile traps - that includes when fishing and boating.

"Remember, you are responsible for your own safety in croc country."

The spokeswoman said all crocodile sighting reports were investigated.



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