News

Why your diet is doomed to fail

PERSONALITY TYPE: A CSIRO study has found dieters fall into five key categories.
PERSONALITY TYPE: A CSIRO study has found dieters fall into five key categories. Creatas Images

WHEN it comes to diets, most Australians tend to over-think, have too high expectations and are anxious about failure - all of which can derail the best intentions.

CSIRO behavioural scientists have identified the dominant diet type among Australian adults, revealing why many people find it hard to maintain a healthy diet.

They found there are five behavioural diet types, with the over-thinking, anxious perfectionist predominant.

The CSIRO surveyed more than 28,000 Australian adults to identify the personality traits and behavioural patterns in relation to eating and weight loss.

They found the leading type of dieter was The Thinker, which accounted for 41% of adults.

People who identify with the Thinker diet type are goal-oriented and analytical yet those same qualities can be counter-productive to achieving diet goals as they tend to over-analyse every decision, set unrealistic expectations and give themselves little margin for error.

This type is more prone to self-doubt, anxiety and stress, which can lead to over-eating and low success.

The research found Australians are motivated to lose weight, with nine out of 10 of the surveyed adults attempting to lose weight at some stage in their life.

About 50% have made more than six attempts while almost 20% have tried more than 25 times.

The Diet Types program aims to identify a person's psychological characteristics which play a key role in improving diet success.

The five main diet personality types across the surveyed population were:

The Thinker - 41%.Overthinking and worrying about failure leads to stress which can derail diet progress.

The Craver - 25%. Craves delicious food and finds it hard to stop, leading to overeating in tempting situations.

The Foodie - 15%. Loves making, eating and experiencing food.

The Socialiser - 15%. Flexibility is essential. You won't let strict food restrictions stifle your social life.

The Freewheeler - 4%. Makes spontaneous and impulsive food choices, finds planning meals hard .

"If you have struggled to maintain your diet after a few weeks, your personal diet type will shed light on what behaviours and habits are creating a barrier for you," CSIRO Behavioural Scientist Dr Sinead Golley said.

"Knowing your personal diet type helps you maintain a healthy eating plan because you are more aware and equipped to manage moments of weakness.

"Successful weight loss requires a different mindset, focused on long-term total wellbeing.

"If you identify as a Thinker, you can improve your eating habits by reflecting more on positive changes and rewarding progressive achievements towards your goal."

The data revealed interesting results for the other four diet types.

The second most common type, The Craver, scored high for people who were obese, while people who identified with The Foodie type were more likely to be a normal weight.

That suggests Cravers may need particular strategies to help them cope with strong desires for food.

When it came to differences between the generations, The Craver group had a high proportion of young adults. Older people scored high for The Socialiser type.

The CSIRO launched the new online Diet Type assessment to help Australians better understand their personal diet type to successfully maintain a diet.

Participants fill in a short survey to receive instant, personalised feedback about the participant's diet type profile and the right strategies to manage it.

More than 28,000 completed the Diet Type assessment in the first two days after it launched and by early this month more than 55,000 people have completed the assessment.

"The large number of participants using the Diet Type assessment demonstrates Australians are highly motivated to understand their personal diet type and what drives their eating habits," CSIRO Research Director and co-author of the Total Wellbeing Diet, Professor Manny Noakes, said.

"Our goal with the diet type program is to connect people with a more personalised eating plan to deliver more sustainable, longer lasting changes in healthy eating habits."

Topics:  csiro dieting new-year-new-you scientists



'Muscle town': Council fights LNP leader over power station

Queensland opposition leader Tim Nicholls made a very quick stop in Gladstone on his way to Biloela yesterday.

Debate over next generation coal-fired power station.

How Gladstone's cheapest and most expensive homes stack up

SPECTACULAR: This home on Springs Road, Agnes Water, is selling in the mid-$2 million range.

With the market currently low, now is the time to invest.

Local Partners

Phelps shredded over shark race fiasco

SOCIAL media is tearing Phelps apart for not swimming next to an animal that would have killed him for certain.

Film boss marvels at Sunshine State

FOR REVIEW AND PREVIEW PURPOSES ONLY. Mark Ruffalo and Chris Hemsworth in a scene from the movie Thor: Ragnarok. Supplied by Marvel.

Thor: Ragnarok success may mean more Marvel movies for Queensland.

ABC's Q&A: Should 16-year-olds be allowed to vote?

Opposition Health Minister Catherine King on the Q & A panel, left, and right, Minister for the Environment and Energy Josh Frydenberg.

But there was one thing the students weren't discussing.

Wilkinson back on air after ‘holiday hell’

Lisa Wilkinson returns to air, cast in hand.

Lisa Wilkinson still feels "a bit ordinary" after holiday from hell

Northern Rivers truckie takes on Ninja Warrior Grand Final

RIGHT AT HOME: Tom Hazell in his backyard ninja set-up.

Truckie one of 21 ninjas in Australian Ninja Warrior grand final

Police sniffer dogs busy at Splendour

Police sniffer dogs at the Splendour in the Grass festival.

Festival upholds its zero tolerance stance against drugs

Diana Chan crowned MasterChef's 2017 winner

MasterChef Australia's 2017 winner Diana Chan. Supplied by Channel 10.

MELBOURNE accountant comes out on top after eight-hour showdown.

First home buyer hopes 'on the horizon'

For Sale sign

Real Estate Institute of Queensland encourages Gladstone home buyers

'We’re goin' to Bonnie Doon!' and now you can too

How's the serenity?

The experience will have you exclaiming “how’s the serenity?”

New life for Bree and historic Oddfellows Hall

TWO CHANGES: Bree Dahl with her new baby Ivy in front of the historic Oddfellows Hall she purchased at auction and will renovate into a house.

Historic hall to be turned into home

Financial scandal destroys alternative community

Families who gave thousands to be a part of an alternative community at Mt Burrell, west of Murwillumbah, are now trying to recover their investment. Picture: Jamie Hanson

Dream Utopia turns into a nightmare