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What the? Grass to be used to make new condoms

NEW TECHNOLOGY:The University of Queensland has a developed a thin and strong latex out of spinifex grass which may make the best condom yet. Contributed: UQ.
NEW TECHNOLOGY:The University of Queensland has a developed a thin and strong latex out of spinifex grass which may make the best condom yet. Contributed: UQ.

THERE are many reasons why Aussies don't like wearing condoms, despite the obvious health benefits.

But with the latest breakthrough in latex technology from The University of Queensland, users won't be complaining about a lack of sensitivity.

Though, they may be surprised by what the condoms are made out of.

The condoms are made out of spinifex grass and will be as thin as a human hair without losing any strength.

Professor Darren Martin of UQ said the latex made produced from the spinifex improved the physical properties of the latex and could be applied to a range of products.

"The great thing about our nancellulose is that it's a flexible nano-additive, so we can make a stronger and thinner membrane that is supple and flexible," Professor Martin said.

UQ is in the process of sitting down with large latex producers and Professor Martin hopes to have the ultra-thin and strong condoms on shelves within three years.

UQ worked in partnership with Aboriginal traditional owners of the Camooweal region in north-west Queensland to develop the innovative method of using spinifex grass to create the latex.

"Spinifex resins have been used traditionally for attaching spear heads to their wooden shafts," Professor Martin said.  

Professor Martin said the new latex could also be used to produce rubber gloves and water filtration devices.

Topics:  condom science technology uq



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