Mohammed Shami believes Indian made a mistake by not selecting a spininer for the second Test.
Mohammed Shami believes Indian made a mistake by not selecting a spininer for the second Test.

'We should have picked a spinner'

INDIA veteran Mohammed Shami believes his side erred by not playing a frontline spinner in the second Test.

The tourists opted for a four-prong pace attack as they hunted an unassailable 2-0 series lead over Australia in Perth, replacing injured offspinner Ravi Ashwin with Umesh Yadav rather than Ravindra Jadeja.

Ashwin's absence has been made all the more glaring by the form of Nathan Lyon, who captured the prized scalp of Virat Kohli on day four at Optus Stadium.

In sharp contrast, offspinning allrounder Hanuma Vihari failed to take a single wicket in Australia's second innings.

Shami, who claimed career-best figures of 6-56 on Monday, opted against toeing the party line when asked about the absence of a tweaker in the XI.

"I feel there should have been a spinner, but these things depend on your management," Shami told reporters in Hindi.

"The team management makes these decisions. We can't do anything about it.

"We had one spinner (Vihari) who didn't bowl badly."

Lyon, the series' leading wicket-taker, admitted on Sunday he was surprised India didn't pick a spinner.

Shami, who inflicted the painful blow to Aaron Finch's right glove that prompted the opener to retire hurt on day three, consistently extracted good bounce from the demonic pitch in Perth.

The right-armer, who has taken 11 wickets at 18.8 in the series, believes India's pacemen are much better placed to trouble Australia on this tour compared to his previous visit in 2014-15.

"We have an Indian pace attack where all the bowlers are fast and are bowling good lines and lengths," he said.

"Four years ago we weren't this experienced. Now we have the experience. You must have seen the difference in our accuracy ... (compared to) four years ago."

News Corp Australia


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