c c c c c c c
c c c c c c c

‘Use a bullet on yourself’: Farmers sent abusive mail

Bush police are investigating "disgraceful" abusive letters telling struggling farmers battling devastating dry conditions that "if you cannot handle the drought, use a bullet on yourself".

The Daily Telegraph has obtained the letter which told producers in the NSW central-west enduring the worst drought in living memory that "no one cares".

"Hey loser, no one cares that you have to send livestock to slaughter," it said.

"All the better when you are forced to send your breeding stock.

The sick missive goes on: "If you cannot handle the drought, use a bullet on yourself … No one cares whether you live or die, not even your family."

The sick letter which farmers have received.
The sick letter which farmers have received.

 

Police found the letters at properties in Dubbo, Walgett and Peak Hill, in the state's central west, last month.

Police are investigating the source of the letters.

NSW farmers are continuing to battle the worst drought on record.
NSW farmers are continuing to battle the worst drought on record.

Rural Crime Prevention Team Detectives are urging anyone who received these letters to photograph and preserve them before making a complaint to police.

"This is downright disgraceful," rural crime co-ordinator Detective Inspector Cameron Whiteside said.

"It is extremely important that these letters are not over-handled, both in a physical sense and by not disclosing information to fellow members of the public which may impact the investigation.

"Victims should report the matter to local police in a very timely manner in order to increase our chances of resolving the nature of these letters."

Fiona Simson, president of National Farmers Federation.
Fiona Simson, president of National Farmers Federation.

 

President of the Australian Farmers Federation Fiona Simson slammed the sickening letters and told The Daily Telegraph that recent drought campaigns showed that it was clear that farmers are supported and valued.

"The general public sympathetic to what people are going through in the bush. We know this, and can see this, with all the money raised and programs created," she said.

"These sentiments are not reflective of the general public. Not at all.

"There is an enormous amount of pressure on farmers and the decisions they have to make during drought There are huge challenges and pressure and it is concerning someone would do something like this at this time."

She added abuse towards producers is not uncommon.

"(The comments) are in line with what some farmers receive on social media," she said.

"But people (don't have to) go on Facebook or (they can) block people online. When a letter arrives in your letterbox it is concerning."



‘Bloody oath’: Inland rail to Gladstone still in the mix

premium_icon ‘Bloody oath’: Inland rail to Gladstone still in the mix

Project to Port of Gladstone a strategic priority for council.

‘It’s a concern’: Staff churn blamed for stalled projects

premium_icon ‘It’s a concern’: Staff churn blamed for stalled projects

Only 83% of operation works are on track to be complete by June 30.

Gladstone Power coaches quit amid committee restructure

premium_icon Gladstone Power coaches quit amid committee restructure

Men's and women's head coaches have stood down.