Turn of phrase leaves a lingering taste after order

AUSSIES are an interesting bunch.

We've got some interesting terms for what we do, from "having a snag", to the classic "she'll be right" to even the bizarre "how's it hanging?".

Some of what we say can come across as strange or even downright rude to the uneducated, but I'd like to know your thoughts on this little effort from the weekend.

On Sunday I jumped out of my little bear cave and headed to the local eatery for a spot of dead cow and cracked eggs to start the day off well before my 40km hike in the forest.

When I ordered my meal from the former model behind the counter I got a little surprise at the end which I didn't know how to take.

All she said was "is that it?".

I didn't know if I should laugh, be offended or if it was slang for something else that I wasn't aware of (perhaps I didn't dress myself properly or something perhaps).

My question for today is: what's an acceptable spoken finish to a meal order?

Is "is that it?" a normal way to finish?

I wasn't after dancing girls to come out from the back and do a little rendition of the Happy song, I'm just wondering if there was another way to end the chat?

I've thought of a few other comments that could have been used over the weekend and here they are.

1. What? Is that all?

2. You want fries with that?

3. Come on, we know you can fit more in. Pick something else.

4. Take a number and we'll be with you in an hour.

5. Huh?

Surely there are plenty of other options that would work well.

I'm sure you are thinking of them right about now, but my point is can we do it better?

Next week I'm heading out to another cafe to stuff my face with orange juice, coffee, snags, eggs and half a loaf of toast just to see what gets said to me at the end.

I challenge anyone to come up with a closing comment that not only makes me crack myself up laughing, but even gets me to think about what was just said as it's early in the day (for some of us).

There you go, the challenge has been set.

I just need to work out a way to work off all the extra kilojoules that I consume.

Walking is one thing but I can't walk up that bloody Mt Larcom hill every second day.



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