A PRIME mover truck driver has fronted court after police checked his logbook against several traffic cameras across Queensland and discovered he had cooked the books.
A PRIME mover truck driver has fronted court after police checked his logbook against several traffic cameras across Queensland and discovered he had cooked the books. Kirstin Payne

Truck driver fined over $2000 for cooking the books

A PRIME mover truck driver has fronted court after police checked his logbook against several traffic cameras across Queensland and discovered he had cooked the books.

Peter Mark Macindoe pleaded guilty in Gladstone Magistrates Court on Tuesday to one count each of solo driver work more than maximum hours (operating under standard hours) and provide false or misleading statements.

Macindoe was caught in a Queensland Police Service road policing taskforce for heavy vehicle enforcement at Iveragh on March 9.

Macindoe was told to handover his National Driver Work Diary where officers found several false entries.

The 50-year-old had entered false times and locations relating to his work travels.

Police cross-checked the data against Department of Transport traffic cameras and confirmed Macindoe had not been travelling through the locations at which his logbook entries suggested.

According to the Basic Fatigue Management legislation of the National Heavy Vehicle Regulator a heavy mover truck driver must not work more than 72 hours over a seven-day period.

The court was told Macindoe also exceeded the legal working hours by nine hours.

Macindoe told police there was "no use in lying" and admitted to creating the false entries.

Macindoe was not represented by a lawyer in court and told Magistrate Dennis Kinsella he had been a truck driver for 32 years.

"It was just a matter of poor judgement your honour," he said.

Magistrate Kinsella noted it was not Macindoe's first time before a court for similar offending.

Macindoe said he clocked up nearly 300,000 km a year but tried his best to "stick by the limits".

Magistrate Kinsella said Macindoe's desire to get home "compelled his misjudgement".

He told Macindoe the logbook requirements were "integral to the system and to the safety of road users".

"Carnage on our roads is a stark reality and one which we must actively avoid," he said.

The court was told the maximum penalties for both charges were $10,000 and $15,000 fines.

Magistrate Kinsella imposed two fines, $1000 and $1500 for the offending.

A conviction was recorded.



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