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Taking up the fight for Mum

FIGHTING: Kirsten Williams, with daughters Jayda, 2, and Charlee, 5, is raising awareness of ovarian cancer. She lost her mother, pictured, to the cancer last year.
FIGHTING: Kirsten Williams, with daughters Jayda, 2, and Charlee, 5, is raising awareness of ovarian cancer. She lost her mother, pictured, to the cancer last year. Brett Wortman

DESPITE her grief, Kirsten Williams felt empowered to take on the fight against ovarian cancer.

In 2008, her mum Wendy Cooley was diagnosed with advanced stages of the lethal disease.

She underwent 73 rounds of chemotherapy, but never went into remission.

"When my mum passed away in March last year, I was inspired to do something with Ovarian Cancer Australia," Ms Williams said.

The North Arm mum now volunteers with the organisation and speaks at Sunshine Coast libraries to raise awareness and inform other women of the signs and symptoms.

"There is no detection test, knowing the signs and symptoms is the only thing that can save your life," she said.

Each year 1400 Australian women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer and 1000 die from the disease.

This makes ovarian cancer the most lethal of all women's cancers.

February is ovarian cancer awareness month and Ovarian Cancer Australia is calling on the public to support their major fundraiser Afternoon Teal.

Teal is the international colour for the cause.

As part of the initiative, Ms Williams will hold a Fields of Teal fundraising event at Joe's Waterhole in Eumundi tomorrow.

"My mum worked there for 20 years in the bottle shop, everyone knows her," she said.

The event runs from 10am to 4pm and includes bands, raffles every hour, auctions, cupcakes, face painting and craft tables for the kids, as well as a mini manicure stall using teal nail polish.

Entry is by a gold coin donation.

Joe's Waterhole is on Memorial Dr, Eumundi.

THE facts

  • Ovarian cancer has the lowest survival rate of any women's cancer.
  • Each year 1400 Australian women are diagnosed and more than 1000 will die from the disease.
  • Ovarian cancer most commonly affects women over 50 who have been through menopause.
  • There is no early detection test, the best way of detecting the disease is to recognise the symptoms including abdominal or pelvic pain, increased abdominal size or persistent abdominal bloating, the need to urinate often or urgently, or feeling full after eating a small amount.
  • In Australia, the overall five year survival rate is 43%.

Topics:  cancer chemotherapy ovarian cancer



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