Funding under the Western Brisbane Transport Network is allocated to
Funding under the Western Brisbane Transport Network is allocated to "higher priorities”. Derek Barry

State confirms Somerset bypass plans still cancelled

SOMERSET is not about to become a freight super-highway.

Funding under the Western Brisbane Transport Network Investigation has been allocated to "higher priorities across the state" as a plan from 2007 to divert traffic past Wivenhoe dam was revisited this week.

Somerset Regional Council proposes to write to Transport Minister Jackie Trad "suggesting a cost-effective Brisbane western bypass solution via the Brisbane Valley might be available".

The council suggests the plan may "potentially incorporate unused road corridors east of the Brisbane River".

A Transport and Main Roads spokesperson said there were no plans for a western bypass through the Brisbane Valley near Lake Wivenhoe.

Transport and Main Roads completed the Western Brisbane Transport Network Investigation in 2009 as a major transport planning study in the west and north-west of Brisbane.

The study addressed the growth in demand for travel, including freight and defined an integrated public transport, road, walking and cycling network for the next 20 years and beyond.

A TMR spokesperson said funding for infrastructure was allocated in accordance with state-wide priorities.

"At this time, there are currently no plans for a western bypass through the Brisbane Valley near Lake Wivenhoe due to other higher priorities across the state," the spokesperson said.



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