Craig Jaundrell 's wife Stacey Jaundrell is now out of jail after pleading guilty to threatening to shoot up a school. Photo by Richard Gosling
Craig Jaundrell 's wife Stacey Jaundrell is now out of jail after pleading guilty to threatening to shoot up a school. Photo by Richard Gosling

‘You beg for toilet paper’: Coast mum’s life on the inside

A GOLD Coast mother who threatened to "shoot up" a school says she had to drink water from a toilet and "beg" for toilet paper during her time in jailhouse "hell".

Stacey Jaundrell spent three months behind bars last year after admitting she posted social messages threatening to "shoot up the (expletive) school tomorrow, got a gun … this will be nothing on Colombians (expletive)".

It forced the Upper Coomera State College into lockdown on two occasions and police attended the school caused desperate parents to report to the school to take their children home.

Craig Jaundrell 's wife Stacey Jaundrell is now out of jail after she posted threatening messages to social media. Photo by Richard Gosling
Craig Jaundrell 's wife Stacey Jaundrell is now out of jail after she posted threatening messages to social media. Photo by Richard Gosling

While out on bail Jaundrell then used a different Facebook account to make further threats to the school.

During the August court hearing Magistrate Donald MacKenzie said he took into account Jaundrell's psychiatric report but believed she was in sound mind as she took steps to try and ensure the threatening messages were not traced back to her.

Jaundrell was released from jail on October 9 after an appeal for a lighter sentence, which included a two-year probation order.

Stacey Jaundrell's blog which had since been deleted.
Stacey Jaundrell's blog which had since been deleted.

In a blog since her release from the Southport Watchhouse and Brisbane Women's Correctional, she wrote that she was innocent, not being treated "like a human being" and the dreadful behaviour of both guards and police.

The blog post published in February has since been deleted.

The Queensland Police Service is not aware of any allegations, and regularly monitors inmates to ensure safety and wellbeing.

"You can be a first timer or a harden criminal and it doesn't get any easirt (sic)," she wrote in February. The post, titled "In sickness, in health and in jail", has since been deleted.

"You're not even treated like a human being."

Police, parents and students at the Upper Coomera State College after the school went into lockdown over social media threats last year. Picture Mike Batterham
Police, parents and students at the Upper Coomera State College after the school went into lockdown over social media threats last year. Picture Mike Batterham

"Guards are dreadful so are the police. I know they are only doing a job (let's argue people broke the law I get it) I use to think the same way until I lived it."

Jaundrell spent 14 days in the Southport watch-house while awaiting a transfer to the Brisbane Women's Correctional Centre (BWCC).

"You're just waiting for your name to come up to go get on a bus that goes to BWCC.

"You get no heads up about when you go to prison just, you're going, get ready. Your (sic) often excited to go to prison."

About Southport Watchhouse, she wrote: "On weekends, prisoners were barely able to sleep in cells often filling with screaming drunks and drug-affected people.

"You are not allowed toothbrushes, you must use your finger. You are not allowed razors. You are not allowed fresh undies or clothing by family. You are only allowed a two-minute shower at 6am each day. No exceptions. You are not allowed no human contact apart from mental health workers, lawyers and officers."

Jaundrell also alleged she was not supplied with water while in the watch-house and instead had to use a cup to get water from the back of the toilet.

"No toilet paper (unless you beg for it). Many inmates in the watch-house did not know what date or day it was until they see their lawyers. Conditions were so bad we lose track of time and dates, no clocks or calendars."

Police at Upper Coomera State College in 2018 after the threats. Picture Mike Batterham
Police at Upper Coomera State College in 2018 after the threats. Picture Mike Batterham

Criminal lawyer Bill Potts said he was not aware of Jaundrell's situation but said the circumstances of her time in custody sounded "highly unusual".

"Police do their absolute best to ensure needs are met, but it is a watch house, not a hotel with room service," he said.

"A watch house is only supposed to be used temporarily and the Queensland police service does its best to ensure that all prisoners that have been ordered to jail spend the least amount of time there (in watch houses) that they possibly can."

Mr Potts said as jails become more over crowded, convicted criminals are spending more and more time in watch houses, which drains police resources.

"Police officers are not prison guards and are often dealing with people who are violent on unwell."

A spokeswoman fro the QPS said there are strict procedures and policies for the care and conditions provided to all prisoners within watchhouses.

"These include provision of the basics for the necessities of life including water, showers and

adequate toilet facilities."

For the welfare and safety of inmates certain items that could be a risk to other prisoners, or the inmate themselves, are not allowed within their cell.

"The Queensland Police Service works to maintain the highest standards in relation to conditions and safety within our watchhouses across the state."

HOW I SURVIVED HELL IN JAIL

1. Listen with your ears.

2. Don't talk crap about anyone to anyone.

3. Everything that happens inside of your jail cell or unit stays there.

4. Don't start arguments with long termers.

5. Don't ask favours.

6. Don't lend.

7. Don't steal.

8. Keep busy.

9. Don't share anything with anyone.

10. Become strong and independent.

11. Make an alliance.



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