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Sex in the city needs to stay legal: call girl

A $900-PER-HOUR Gladstone sex worker has struck back at calls to outlaw the age-old industry.

"Crystal", who travels from the Gold Coast to the city for work every eight weeks, said her profession was keeping marriages together.

"The majority of guys that are seeing me are married, and they wouldn't be if it wasn't for ladies like us," the down-to-earth Crystal said.

Crystal's response came after FamilyVoice Australia's Queensland state officer, Geoffrey Bullock, called for the State Government to adopt Swedish laws to eradicate all forms of prostitution.

"We know that prostitution and sex trafficking abound, particularly in towns where there's industry and mining," Mr Bullock said, citing Emerald as an example.

"In all of the country towns where there's close-by industry or mining, these sorts of things happen."

Local police were not aware of any potential "black market" sex industry operating in Gladstone, according to Gladstone Inspector Darren Somerville.

"I don't know if it's any more prevalent here than anywhere else, both legal and illegal," Insp Somerville said.

"It's not something that comes up a lot (in Gladstone), but there's a prostitution taskforce based in Brisbane who monitor that sort of thing.

"If there's any illegal prostitution going on we get information and follow up on that."

Mr Bullock was blunt when asked about potential backlash from legally compliant call girls who see the industry as a legitimate business.

"There's plenty of other sources of income around aren't there," he said.

Crystal, who admitted the industrial towns were a lucrative market purely because of cashed-up clientele, said those continuing to criticise sex workers like her were not qualified to comment, without understanding individual situations.

"I actually did it (prostitution) to bring up my three kids and give them a good education," she said.

"Just because of what I do, I'm not different to anyone else."

Crystal said she commanded from $350-$900 per hour for her services.

She said it was fruitless to try to stamp out a centuries-old industry.

"I just don't agree with people that want to stop the industry.

''They're probably sex-deprived themselves," Crystal said.

"It's (prostitution) the oldest trick in the book and it's always going to be around."

Gladstone resident Herb Linwood believed the sex industry was a "necessary evil".

"As far as I'm concerned it keeps the attacks on women down; too much of that goes on," Mr Linwood said.

"They're (prostitutes) more or less a necessary evil, especially in a town like this with the industry."

A spokeswoman for Gladstone's Into Love adult store said she hadn't seen a huge number of people, who frequented her store, seeking adult services.

"I don't get a lot of calls from guys looking for prostitutes, considering the number of single guys in here working away from home," she said.

"If they do come here I try and sell them a toy so they don't go home with any nasty surprises."

Topics:  gladstone prostitution



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