Roundabout indication question sparks road rule debate

 

A simple question about the right way to indicate on a roundabout has sparked a debate after some drivers disagreed with the correct answer.

The Department of Transport and Main Roads Queensland (TMR) tested the road rules knowledge of its Facebook followers by posting a photo of a blue car entering a roundabout.

"The blue car wants to travel straight ahead at the roundabout. How should they indicate?"

The post attracted hundreds of comments and while the majority of people got the question right, there was still a surprising number who didn't know the answer.

Some people believed the driver didn't have to indicate at all when driving straight through a roundabout, a mistake that could result in a fine of up to $393.

"No blinker required," one person said.

"Who in Qld uses an indicator when going straight and exiting … no one, no need to start today," another said.

A surprising amount of people got the answer wrong. Picture: Department of Transport and Main Roads Queensland/Facebook
A surprising amount of people got the answer wrong. Picture: Department of Transport and Main Roads Queensland/Facebook

Other people were sure you had to indicate both when you enter and exit the roundabout.

"Yes the car should indicate when entering and exiting the roundabout as it has two lanes," one motorist wrote.

Another road user said a driver going straight through has the option to indicate right on entry but must also indicate left when leaving the roundabout.

One person agreed, saying they were sure it was "right on entry and left on exit", but they changed their mind after looking up the rule.

"Ugh. Just checked. Looks like I was wrong. I will track down my driving instructor from a billion years ago and have a word with him. Jerk shouted at me when I didn't indicate on entry going straight ahead," they wrote.

ANSWER REVEALED

TMR eventually posted the correct answer, revealing the driver only has to indicate when exiting the roundabout.

"Because they're travelling straight through, the driver of the blue car *doesn't* need to indicate when they enter the roundabout," the post read.

"They do though need to flick on the left indicator to exit the roundabout (and off again once they've exited)."

For those that didn't quite understand, the TMR said they should think of a roundabout like a clock face.

"Any turn that exits before 12 o'clock can be considered a left turn (so you'd indicate left when you're entering the roundabout)," the post read.

"Any turn that exits after 12 o'clock can be considered a right turn (so you'd indicate right entering the roundabout).

"Straight ahead at a roundabout can be considered 12 o'clock (so you wouldn't indicate on entry)."

Not indicating off a roundabout could result in a big fine. Picture: Andrew Seymour
Not indicating off a roundabout could result in a big fine. Picture: Andrew Seymour

Despite the answer being laid out in very simple terms, there were a few people who continued to disagree with the rule.

One person said it was a "dumb, stupid rule".

"Indicating through or off a roundabout misleads other drivers considering it is legal to change lanes in a roundabout you can assume they're about to merge on top of you, only to find out they're exiting the damn roundabout indicating un-needingly(sic)."

"You should only have to indicate if you are going left or right. Why tell people the need to indicate to go straight ahead," another person said.

One person said indicating off a roundabout just "complicates things".

BIG FINES FOR IGNORING RULE

In NSW not giving a left signal when exiting a roundabout could land you with a $191 fine and two demerit points.

In Tasmania failing to indicate left when leaving a roundabout if it is practicable will result in a $126 fine and two demerit points.

Those in Queensland who don't indicate left when leaving a roundabout will cop a $80 fine and 2 demerit points.

Not following this rule in Western Australia will result in a $100 fine and two points and in the ACT it will also cost you two demerit points as well as a $292 fine.

Drivers in the Northern Territory and South Australia will also be fined for this offence, with the latter copping two demerit points and a total fine of $393.



Send letter to Santa at  North Pole

premium_icon Send letter to Santa at North Pole

Last year, more than 130,000 letters and wishlists were delivered to the North Pole...

‘High-risk’: Authorities crack down on fishing industry

premium_icon ‘High-risk’: Authorities crack down on fishing industry

COMMERCIAL fishermen are encouraged to attend a workshop in Gladstone to learn more...

‘Blatant fallacies’: Worry over ‘lies’ about Biloela family

premium_icon ‘Blatant fallacies’: Worry over ‘lies’ about Biloela family

"At the end of the day we would like to trust our government."