Lack of road access to Gladstone port hurts business

THE road network in and around Gladstone and Australia's second largest port is incapable of handling the trucks that keep Australia moving.

Transport operator Simon Humble forks out $440 in fuel costs for a delivery that should only cost him $200.

Mr Humble's company Keetah Contractors runs a fleet of 25 trucks around central Queensland.

But to access one of his primary destinations, the Gladstone Port, his drivers are forced to unhook a trailer in Gracemere, for example, drive into Gladstone to unload, return to Gracemere, pick up the trailer, drive back into Gladstone to unload, before reassembling their trucks and heading off.

Mr Humble says the lack of transport infrastructure is a "disaster".

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"It's a massive amount of extra time. The infrastructure is not up to standard.

"As a transport operator in Gladstone having road train access into the port would absolutely change the way we do business," Mr Humble said.

"If the infrastructure caught up (to the port) that would be good."

Last year 149,387 tonnes of grain was exported through the Gladstone. This is expected to increase this year because of the better season.

And that means more trucks on the road, doing more runs between centres like Biloela and Gracemere, and Gladstone.



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