With one B grade and three E’s, the Fitzroy region has flunked its report card from the Australian and Federal Government regarding water quality in the Barrier Reef. PICTURE: BRENDAN RADKE
With one B grade and three E’s, the Fitzroy region has flunked its report card from the Australian and Federal Government regarding water quality in the Barrier Reef. PICTURE: BRENDAN RADKE

REVEALED: Fitzroy flunks Barrier Reef report card

The Fitzroy region has flunked its 2019 Great Barrier Reef report card, with huge work to be done if 2025 water quality targets are to be met.

In data handed down by the Minister for the Environment Sussan Ley today, the Fitzroy region managed three Es (Very Poor) and a B (Good).

The region’s first failure was its grading for the reduction of sediment, which returned an E.

The fine sediment load leaving catchments showed reduction of 10.1 per cent to June 2019, a reduction of 0.2 per cent from July 2018 to June 2019.

The 2025 water quality target of a 25 per cent reduction is still a long way from completion with just a few years remaining until deadline.

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Nearly 96 per cent of species in the Fitzroy region are protected, which heralded a B grading for pesticide reduction.

The Fitzroy region is well on track to meet the 2025 target of 99 per cent protection.

Particulate nitrogen levels within the Fitzroy catchment region received an E grade overall, with a 5.4 per cent reduction being displayed to date.

The 2025 water quality target for the reduction in particulate nitrogen is 15 per cent.

Minister for the Environment Sussan Ley said the report showed there were strong programs in place and that we can and are making a difference.

A particulate phosphorus reduction of 9.2 per cent to date meant the Fitzroy region was slapped with another E grading.

A 0.2 per cent reduction in 2019 means the 2025 water quality target of a 20 per cent reduction in particulate phosphorus levels is still a long way from complete.

“We have invested in further programs since the period covered in the report and are committed to further reef water quality improvements,” Ms Ley said.

“The fact that the overall marine condition remains poor underlines the importance of those investments.”

More environmental news:

- Fear residents could have been using toxic water for years

- Illegal, dangerous plants sold at Brisbane markets

- Deborah Mailman dives into the dystopic future



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