Attenborough doco highlights native birdlife on Heron

THE ghostly and raucous sounds of the native birds on Heron Island were featured on David Attenborough's latest episode of his Great Barrier Reef documentary.

The noises from the noddy tern and shearwater could be described as loud and disruptive.

 

National Parks and Wildlife principal conservation officer Graham Hemson said sound sensors were used to determine how many birds lived on Capricorn Cay islands.

The last numbers totalled 500,000 noddys and 700,000 shearwaters, the largest recorded population in one area on the Great Barrier Reef.

Sir David Attenborough pictured with a black noddy on Heron Island in a scene from the TV series David Attenborough's Great Barrier Reef. Supplied by ABC TV. Please credit photo to Freddie Claire.
Sir David Attenborough pictured with a black noddy on Heron Island in a scene from the TV series David Attenborough's Great Barrier Reef. Supplied by ABC TV. Please credit photo to Freddie Claire. Freddie Claire

Soon they also hope to be able to determine reproductive rates using studies of the breeding sounds.

For the noddy, Mr Hemson described it as a "shattering raucous" sound and the shearwater has a ghostly hum.

"I actually love the sound because when you get both of them at the same time, that's when you really know you're at the Capricorn Cays," he said.



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