2016-17 had the highest percentage of kids in Gladstone courts since 2012-2013.
2016-17 had the highest percentage of kids in Gladstone courts since 2012-2013. Nicholas Falconer/FILE

Kids in Gladstone court at highest rate in 5 years

THE percentage of children facing charges in Gladstone's courtrooms is at its highest in five years, according to a new report.

Tabled in parliament, the new review on Queensland's Magistrates Courts revealed out of Gladstone's 2505 defendants last year, 96 of them (3.83 per cent) were children under 16.

This is 2.12 per cent below the state average.

Between 2016-2017, 2409 people appeared in Gladstone Magistrates Court for 4397 charges, and 96 defendants faced 235 charges in the Gladstone Children's Court.

Court appearances in Gladstone, including children, amounted to 1.07 per cent of the state's total charges.

The percentage is the lowest it has been since 2012-2013.

Despite the drop in total appearances, the percentage of child defendants has increased in the past year.

One year ago (2015-2016), 1.89 per cent of defendants in Gladstone were children, almost two per cent less than the amount of children defendants who appeared in the past financial year.

Child defendants in Gladstone the past four years

  • 2014-2015: 2.64 per cent
  • 2013-2014: 3.69 per cent
  • 2012-2013 - 3.1 per cent

Charges and defendants in Queensland

2015-2016

  • 219,218 defendants
  • 416,944 charges

2016-2017

  • 202,160 defendants
  • 399667 charges

The law determining what age a defendant should appear in a Queensland Childrens Court was changed this year to include all defendants under the age of 18. Previously in Queensland, defendants 17 and over were classified as adults.



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