Rosie Batty, Australian of the Year, whether or not she finally has closure for the murder of son Luke by her ex-partner, has bravely opened a Pandora’s Box with dialogue about domestic violence. It has been a taboo subject for too long.
Rosie Batty, Australian of the Year, whether or not she finally has closure for the murder of son Luke by her ex-partner, has bravely opened a Pandora’s Box with dialogue about domestic violence. It has been a taboo subject for too long.

READER'S VIEW on DV: has been a taboo subject for too long

ROSIE Batty, Australian of the Year, whether or not she finally has closure for the murder of son Luke by her ex-partner, has bravely opened a Pandora's Box with dialogue about domestic violence. It has been a taboo subject for too long.

It is a euphemism for assault and murder.

It is not a just private matter behind closed doors, as it has been for too long, for past generations and still is, in some parts of the world. It has opened up a discussion about how negligent some departments were to protect victims of violence, through lack of co-ordination and cross-communication between the relevant systems engaged in these acts of family violence.

A post mortem and review of all systems associated with relationship violence has revealed the systemic failure of Victoria's law and order system, to protect her and her child from a very dangerous known perpetrator. Under-resourced and delayed responses contributed.

Misogyny is alive and well in every culture and nation globally.

It was Maxine McKew, Australian politician, in an analysis of reasons and contributing factors, who suggested that many offenders of relationship violence display an undercurrent of anger and rage that cannot be contained by any system.

Worldwide, there are 62 million girls (and consequently women) denied formal education, kept silent and under the thumb of men in their lives. It spans cross-culture and socio-economic strata globally and does not seem to be abating, but has reached epidemic proportions, despite awareness and discussions about how to combat this social disaster. In many developing nations, women are kept voiceless and covered, to the detriment of all family members and the loss to their societies.

Too much male consent, overtly or covertly, is granted by many nations, empowering men over their families and property without challenge. Women have been sexualised and demonised, contributing to the mentality which allows men to hurt their own. If women and girls are given a second-class citizen rating, then this condones their devastating treatment. The English "rule of thumb", once legitimate in the nineteenth century, has endured into the third millennium, with consent given to men over wives and children, to thrash them when necessary, with nothing thicker than their thumb, still in theory and practice.

To destroy half the population doubles the fallout. A society is judged on how it treats its most vulnerable. Australia stands among the judged, when systems fail innocents and take lives.

Eloise Rowe

Tannum Sands



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