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Radio calls for help before another natural disaster hits

The Gladstone Amateur Radio Club operates from the highest peak of Kroombit Tops National Park.
The Gladstone Amateur Radio Club operates from the highest peak of Kroombit Tops National Park. Contributed

THE Gladstone Amateur Radio Club knew after flooding last year that communications in the Boyne Valley were less than adequate during natural disasters.

Approaching its first anniversary, the non-profit, community organisation is operating from the summit of Kroombit Tops to ensure residents can access alerts and assistance in the event of a repeat.

The club relies on minimal funding and second-hand equipment to deliver a vital service to people living in rural areas.

"The government pledged to improve communications, but nothing has happened," president Paul Beales said.

"We need assistance to have permanent hope of maintaining our licence and this service."

Topics:  communications radio tower



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