SEASONAL BOTANY: Brent Braddick, Tondoon Gardens Curator
SEASONAL BOTANY: Brent Braddick, Tondoon Gardens Curator Greg Bray

Port Curtis' tribes lived well off the land, could you?

GLADSTONE'S indigenous communities were extremely adept at finding food around the region.

Curator of Tondoon Gardens Brent Braddick said the Aboriginal people certainly knew where and when to find plants that provided them with food.

"In the 1990's archaeologist Michael Strong investigated the movements of the local Aboriginal people," he said.

"He worked out that they crossed The Narrows from Curtis Island and worked their way through the scrub.

"They kept to the creeks that had permanent water, came through the back of Tondoon Gardens down to Wild Cattle Creek.

"It was a regular trek they used to do."

Mr Braddick said they would have consisted of family groups and they knew exactly where and when to find bush foods.

"They would have been extremely aware of the different times various plants produced food during the year," he said.

"They would have gathered tubers, water lilies, seeds and fruits like Burdekin plums, Cocky apples, wild oranges, bush cherries and berries.

"It would have taken a lot of time but there was plenty of food around here if you knew where and when to look."



BE BUZZED: Native pollinators focus of Calliope workshop

premium_icon BE BUZZED: Native pollinators focus of Calliope workshop

'There is a growing interest to learn more about our local bees'

No injuries in two-vehicle crash in South Gladstone

premium_icon No injuries in two-vehicle crash in South Gladstone

A police spokeswoman said it happened around 1.30pm outside a motel

PHOTOS: Seniors see benefits of trying True Light

premium_icon PHOTOS: Seniors see benefits of trying True Light

The sessions were held as part of seniors week activities.