Paws and think about where your feline friend is now

MEOW: Cats are living dangerously.
MEOW: Cats are living dangerously. Contributed

WHERE is your cat right now? If you can't answer that question, it's time to check they aren't running across the street, or merrily sitting in the middle of it.

Driving at night after working late shifts, I've seen too many glowing green eyes for my liking.

This week alone I had an encounter too close for comfort on Auckland St.

While I'm pleased to report my brakes are spick and span after a recent service, I despair at the need to use them.

I'm no feline fan - although the photos of kitties (with their mini personal ads) The Observer often prints for the Friends of RSPCA cat adoption days do pull at the heart strings.

But I dread to think I could be responsible for someone losing a pet.

It seems to me it's the personality of a pet that makes them so dear to people.

I was often called an "old soul" by a colleague who left this week for a gig down south, and my chum Max Maynard is the same way inclined.

The pampered pooch is more than happy to sit with a blanket on the couch and watch Miss Marple solve a murder mystery.

I hate to think of him out of the yard and in danger at night, least of all because once outside for five minutes he circles our block then waits patiently to be let back in.

After all, the hard ground is no place for a bichon frise to sleep.

Just as the street is no place for adorable Garfield.

But a trap that could work on irresponsible pet owners may be a better solution, as really it's they, and not their animals, who should take the blame.

There is something to be said about their night time activities being a detriment to the popularity of the species.

I'm not sure whether the cries and squeals waking me up in the middle of the night of late are of cats fighting or mating. But it is disconcerting either way.

I also remember - with slight bitterness - the closure of the family sandpit due to neighbouring cats.

Around the same time other neighbours tired of the impact of cats on their cars.

They told the owners, but in the end they had to resort to a cat trap from the council.

It was an enterprise that ultimately forced the owners to accept the fact it was their moggy at fault.

Unfortunately, I can't think of any sort of trap that could work roadside.

But a trap that could work on irresponsible pet owners may be a better solution, as really it's they, and not their animals, who should take the blame.

As that's unlikely, perhaps a fine for problem pets is the solution.

There's nothing like the ever increasing populist trend of a threat to the hip pocket to inspire concern.



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