Menu
News

Parents sought for help in infant sleep study

CQUNIVERSITY has launched one of the most comprehensive studies into community perspectives regarding sleep and settling strategies for infants and toddlers.

Researcher Hayley Etherton, from CQUniversity's Appleton Institute in Adelaide, said while sleep experts know that the impact of sleep and settling problems in young children is extensive (up to 40% of new parents), they know little about the strategies and methods used by parents to cope with sleep issues and the decisions to pursue some and not others.

"A range of strategies and interventions are available to treat sleep and settling problems, some more widely known and available than others. Suggestions have been made by researchers and health professionals that some parents may not be happy with some recommended strategies or interventions, and therefore may be left struggling to manage sleep and settling issues.

"Therefore, it is important that we understand caregivers' choices regarding sleep and settling in their children and reasons for or against uptake of strategies and interventions in order to maximise treatment options for parents in need and at risk."

An online survey for parents of infants and toddlers aged 6 to 18 months was launched in early December and will continue for the next six months.

Parents are encouraged to participate in the survey by visiting the research group's Facebook site.

"Our research findings will be used to understand the factors which assist parents to seek or receive help with sleep and settling issues, in order to develop strategies for improving availability, delivery, and uptake of information and interventions," Ms Etherton said.

Topics:  babies children cquniversity parenting sleep



'You're the boss, mate': Man won't stop interrupting magistrate

Gladstone Court House, Yarroon Street.



Photo Brenda Strong / The Observer

Selwyn Noel Eather, 53, said he had 'unknowingly' ingested drugs.

Safe Haven's chance to set up a natural refuge

TINDER DRY: Ms Janssen said because of the very dry conditions on the South Australian property they found no evidence of wombats breeding and "no babies”.

Instead of being killed, wombats may be re-homed in South Australia.

NEXT STAGE: New community asset coming to Tannum Sands

LISTEN UP: The new stage will mean the committee behind the BAM festival will no longer have to hire a stage each month.

The facility will be donated to council by BTABC and Boyne Smelters.

Local Partners