OP results: Our most improved schools revealed

 

NEARLY 60 per cent of Queensland schools have achieved staggering improvements in the proportion of students getting top OPs over the past decade, exclusive analysis reveals.

Comparing the percentage of students who gained an overall position between one and 5 in 2009 and 2019 showed stellar success around the state, with 194 schools bettering their results.

The most improved was Benowa State High School, which had 20 per cent of its 115 OP eligible students achieve an OP 1 to 5 in 2009, while 72 per cent of its 11 eligible students landed top marks last year.

The second most improved was Southport State High School by 33.98 percentage points, followed by Toowoomba's Clifton State High School (31.36 pp), Bundaberg's St Luke's Anglican School (28.02 pp) and Maryborough's Riverside Christian College (27.78 pp).

Cannon Hill Anglican College year 12 students Emma Cooney and Isaac Reed. Picture Annette Dew
Cannon Hill Anglican College year 12 students Emma Cooney and Isaac Reed. Picture Annette Dew

Cannon Hill Anglican College was the most improved Brisbane school, having increased its percentage of OP students in the top five bandwidths from 24.6 per cent in 2009 to 47.29 in 2019.

College principal Gary O'Brien said their OP success was a result of their well-rounded approach to education that covers more than just academics.

"We are preparing students for a world marked by unprecedented rates of change and disruption," he said.

High-achieving students Emma Cooney and Isaac Reed both last week received awards for their academic prowess but equally focus on extra-curricular activities for success.

Mr Reed hopes to achieve an ATAR in the high 90s to pursue university study in politics, philosophy and Economics while pursuing his passion for saxophone.

While Miss Cooney hopes to achieve in the high 90s as well, she's "trying not to focus on a final number".

 

Benowa State High School principal Mark Rickard with school captains Matthew Coombes and Jemma Davey. Picture: Richard Gosling/AAP
Benowa State High School principal Mark Rickard with school captains Matthew Coombes and Jemma Davey. Picture: Richard Gosling/AAP

 

"I plan on moving abroad for university, with a lifelong dream of mine being to study at Princeton University in the USA, my main area of interest at this point in time is pursuing a course surrounding maths or physics," she said.

Mr O'Brien said the school was well positioned to transition to the new QCE system with the biggest change being external exams and the need to apply knowledge and skills developed across a longer period of time.

"Skills around revising and understanding concepts and regularly reviewing learning have been emphasised in our current practice."

Education minister Grace Grace said Queensland schools were always looking to improve and adapt so students could achieve to the best of their abilities.

"Highly skilled teachers, delivering relevant curriculum in world class facilities is helping to produce better learning environments for Queensland children."

 



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