PERFECT SCORE: Chynna-Loren Sheremta, Abbey Hurst, Marlize Nel and Coen Townson are all proud of their OP 1 scores, and worked tirelessly all year.
PERFECT SCORE: Chynna-Loren Sheremta, Abbey Hurst, Marlize Nel and Coen Townson are all proud of their OP 1 scores, and worked tirelessly all year. Mike Richards GLA231216TOPS

OP 1 students ready to tackle careers in the big bucks

SOME set alarms, others kept their computers at no more than an arm's length away.

But most Year 12 students were too excited to wait, constantly hitting the refresh button on their phones eagerly waiting to find out what OP they scored.

The ultimate goal, for a big, fat, number one to show up on their screen.

For Tannum Sands State High School students Chynna-Loren Sheremta, Coen Townson, Abbey Hurst, Marlize Nel and Mitchell Giles-Duffy, this was their reality, a perfect score with an almost guaranteed pick of any university.

But it didn't come easily for the students who spent their year studying and stressing with lots of late nights and early mornings, handing in multiple drafts before getting it perfect.

And then of course, was the big one, the Queensland Scores Test, a statewide external test that all OP eligible students must sit, which contributes to the final score.

While there were practice tests, 17-year-old Chynna-Loren said you could never really be ready for it.

"I don't think there were many people who felt confident going into that test,” she said.

"A lot of us probably just winged it.”

Chynna-Loren spent schoolies at the Gold Coast, and is now looking to enjoy the break before diving into her studies and career.

"I want to study medicine - in the surgery field hopefully at either James Cook University or University of Queensland,” she said.

"I have always been interested in medicine, and working with my hands to be able to physically help people.”

For Coen, 17, it took many sleepless nights, even with some assignments done the night before, for him to get the perfect score.

The keen physics student hopes to study Advanced Science in Sydney.

"I'm really interested in understanding how things work the way they do - the physics of things,” he said.

"I would like a career in research - really digging into the complexities of things.”

Coen said during his break before starting university, he was going to indulge in some much needed sleep-ins.

Abbey, 17 also hopes to study advanced science in the biomedical field, with her options endless.

"I found the biggest transition was Year 10 to 11, Year 12 wasn't that much different, you just had to know that it was the year everything counted,” she said.

"I want to study the biomedical field because I find that being able to help people through research is very appealing.”

Marlize, 18, hopes to juggle a dual degree in engineering and advanced science.

"Year 12 was super fast-paced, people say it goes in a blink of an eye and at the time you don't believe them, but it really did,” she said.

"In hindsight, I would tell myself to stop stressing as much, to let my hair down a bit and just know that not everything had to be as hard as I made it to get the perfect grade.

"I chose engineering because it's applied science, research is my strong point, and it is a career that can potentially have you make a lot of money.”



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