Old time Gladstone worker passes on knowledge

NOT every day do we get to sit down and listen to the stories from our elderly locals.

Tannum Sands State High School (TSSHS) students Porcia and Hannah had the opportunity to meet and pick the brains of one of Gladstone's locals.

A TSSHS spokeswoman said Fred Critchley had been a Gladstone local for about 47 years, meaning he had an exquisite wealth of knowledge on the region.

"On Thursday at the Feast on East markets, Porcia and Hannah met and chatted with Fred Critchley," the TSSHS spokeswoman said.

"They found out that he was one of the original men who built the waterfall at East Shores."

OLD-TIMER: Tannum Sands State High School students Porcia and Hannah met and chatted with Fred Critchley.
OLD-TIMER: Tannum Sands State High School students Porcia and Hannah met and chatted with Fred Critchley.

Works at East Shores began in the early 1970s as part of a council beautification scheme with the assistance of local voluntary organisations including the Rotary Club, according to a report by the Gladstone Regional Council.

The TSSHS spokeswoman said it went to show how important talking to people from a range of diversities was.

"Making conversation and connections with people of all ages is an important skill to have, in business and in life," the TSSHS spokes woman said.

Through the enlightening conversation, the two TSSHS students discovered they knew Mr Critchley's granddaughter and fellow TSSHS student.



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