NO ACTION: The council won’t be building any walls to counteract erosion at Wild Cattle Creek in Tannum Sands.
NO ACTION: The council won’t be building any walls to counteract erosion at Wild Cattle Creek in Tannum Sands. Paul Braven

Council waits to see what happens with Tannum erosion

BEACH-GOERS at Tannum might have to build sandcastles somewhere other than at Wild Cattle Creek.

The sand is disappearing and Gladstone Regional Council won't be spending any money on preventative action.

They're adopting a "wait and see" policy to the area that is now covered in rocks, where the walkway still hangs metres above the ground.

Gladstone Regional Council says it will build barrier fencing and a new beach access following a draft report from a coastal engineer.

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But it has not decided on any protective action. Instead it will monitor the ongoing erosion.

It's already been established that erosion is an issue in the Wild Cattle Creek area, in the Ecosure BITS SEMP report released last year that cost $67,819 to produce.

After Cyclone Marcia in February, parts of the dunes collapsed, taking down trees, logs and vegetation.

Council CEO Stuart Randle said instead of spending money trying to protect the beach, the council would "wait and see" if the sand came back.

He said aerial photos dating back to the 1970s showed sand was constantly moving in and out of the area.

"We aren't expecting the erosion to get much worse," Mr Randle said.

He said the council didn't consider the park a valuable asset worth going to lengths to protect.

"People expect us to rush out and build big revetment walls out of rock, but they create certain other erosion processes themselves," he said.

Dr Emma Jackson, an environment research fellow based in Gladstone with Central Queensland University, agrees.

Her studies focus on sediment movement and their impacts on seagrass, particularly in the Wild Cattle Creek area.

Dr Jackson said building a sea wall could recreate the problem elsewhere.

"The erosion continues and is basically perpetuating the problem further down the coast," she said.

Revegetation, walls and allowing the erosion to happen naturally are the most common ways of dealing with the problem, she said.



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