Terry Bishop, brother of one punch victim Lindsay Ede, leaves Brisbane Supreme Court with supporters after sentencing of Ariik Mayot, the first person charged under Queensland law with unlawful striking causing death, Mayot attacked Lindsay Ede as he walked to his brother's Goodna home in 2015.
Terry Bishop, brother of one punch victim Lindsay Ede, leaves Brisbane Supreme Court with supporters after sentencing of Ariik Mayot, the first person charged under Queensland law with unlawful striking causing death, Mayot attacked Lindsay Ede as he walked to his brother's Goodna home in 2015.

Where's the justice? Family in shock at killer's sentence

THE brother of slain Goodna grandfather Lindsay Ede says his family has been failed by the very law designed to bring violent thugs like Ariik Mayot to justice.

This is after Mayot, 20, has been sentenced to four years behind bars for the single, unprovoked punch which caused Mr Ede to fall onto a suburban footpath with a skull crushing thud in June, 2015. He has already spent two years in remand.

The landmark sentence, handed down by Queensland's Chief Justice Catherine Holmes, is the first for the offence of unlawful striking causing death, a charge brought in by the Newman Government during its crackdown on alcohol-related violence and one-punch attacks.

Bitterly disappointed and still in disbelief, Mr Ede's brother Terry Bishop told reporters outside Brisbane Supreme Court on Monday he had hoped the promised "tough stance" on random acts of violence would attract a heavier penalty.

"Nothing is going to bring Lindsay back but 15 years would have been nice, even 10," Mr Bishop said

"It is very disappointing, very sad.

"To be honest, I think my brother's life was worth more than that.

"It was supposed to be this new law for unlawful striking...that's not really setting a precedent is it?

"It just means that anyone else who is going to go out and do this will probably get the same.

"That's not fair...it's shocking.

Mr Ede's family also rejected the contents of an apology letter in which Mayot expressed guilt about the attack and said he did not expect forgiveness.

"At the end of the day, I don't want to get out of jail too quick," Mayot's statement read

"I want to be reminded every day I am in jail because I took someone's life.

"I have got a life sentence because even if I get out I have to live with the fact I took someone's life."

The court heard Mayot was on his way to hand himself in to the police station for an unrelated offence and was angry and agitated when he passed Mr Ede on the street.

Lindsay Ede.
Photo Contributed
Lindsay Ede. Photo Contributed Contributed

Chief Justice Holmes accepted Mayot, who she said had suffered racism and bullying since his Catholic family fled the Muslim controlled Sudan when he was still a child, believed Mr Ede had called him a "black bastard" before the attack.

She referred to the report of a psychologist which stated that at 19, his age at the time of the attack, Mayot's brain was "still developing"

"Recognition of your learned defence mechanisms cuts two ways," Justice Holmes said

"It provides some explanation which is otherwise lacking for what you did but it makes you a dangerous person unless you learn to control that response."

Ariik Mayot, 20, pleaded guilty to the one-punch killing of Ipswich grandfather Lindsay Ede on June 22.
Ariik Mayot, 20, pleaded guilty to the one-punch killing of Ipswich grandfather Lindsay Ede on June 22.

But Justice Holmes said it was also important to take into account Mayot's lack of criminal history and his remorse.

Mayot did not react when the four-year sentence was read out.

Under the legislation, he must serve at least 80% of his sentence in jail. Taking into account the two years he has already served, Mayot will have spent at least five years behind bars before he is eligible to apply for parole.

-ARM Newsdesk



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