Brisbane university student Yassmin Abdel-Magied, 19, has a passion for fast cars, especially Ferraris: “I just became enamoured with these beautiful machines.’’
Brisbane university student Yassmin Abdel-Magied, 19, has a passion for fast cars, especially Ferraris: “I just became enamoured with these beautiful machines.’’ Paul Harris

'The most publicly hated Muslim in Australia’: Abdel-Magied

YASSMIN Abdel-Magied has written a passionate essay describing herself as "the most publicly hated Muslim in Australia" in which she details the toll three months of attack have taken on her.

The former ABC presenter announced this week that she was leaving Australia for London, after her controversial Anzac Day post - in which she wrote, "Lest. We. Forget (Manus, Nauru, Syria, Palestine ...)" - led to, three months of what she described as, "90,000 twisted words written about me ... largely laced with hate".

The months of vitriol hurled her way have taken their toll on the 26-year-old, she wrote in The Guardian.

"Do I reveal that ... I get death threats on a daily basis, and I have to reassure my parents that I will be fine, when maybe I won't be," she wrote.

"That I've resorted to moving house, changing my phone number, deleting my social media apps.

"That journalists sneak into my events with schoolchildren to sensationally report on what I share.

"That I've been sent videos of beheadings, slayings and rapes from people suggesting the same should happen to me.

"Do I reassure my parents or do I tell them the truth? I have yet to decide."

Ms Abdel-Magied's show Australia Wide was axed by the ABC a month after her controversial Anzac Day post, which she deleted after it prompted widespread outrage.

Among those to welcome the move was Immigration Minister Peter Dutton, who accused the national broadcaster of having a "cultural problem".

"One down, many to go," he told Sydney radio station 2GB in the wake of the announcement.

Ms Abdel-Magied announced earlier this week she was moving to London, describing it as an "Aussie rite of passage".

However, the move found her mired in further controversy, when Channel 7 asked readers in a Facebook poll whether her decision to leave was a good move.

It was later deleted after being slammed by followers and commentators for inciting racist discussion and bullying.

After being questioned by news.com.au, the station removed the poll and admitted it "should never have been posted".

Ms Abdel-Magied said the ongoing abuse she has suffered since Anzac Day has affected her "deeply and personally".

"Whether or not one agrees with me isn't really the point. The reality is the visceral nature of the fury - almost every time I share a perspective or make a statement in any forum - is more about who I am than about what is said," she said.

"We should be beyond that but we are not.

"Many, post-Anzac, said the response wasn't about me but about what I represent. Whether or not that is true, it has affected my life, deeply and personally."

News Corp Australia


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