CFMEU: ‘Mining bosses must be included in industrial manslaughter laws’.
CFMEU: ‘Mining bosses must be included in industrial manslaughter laws’.

CFMEU: Mining industrial manslaughter a ‘non-negotiable’

IN THE aftermath of the fifth Queensland mining death since December, the CFMEU has demanded the inclusion of mining bosses in industrial manslaughter laws as a "must".

Introduced by the State Government in 2017, industrial manslaughter includes fines of up to $10 million for businesses and up to 20 years jail for individuals but does not cover the mining sector.

CFMEU Mining and Energy Queensland district president Stephen Smyth said the "time for talk is now over" after a mine worker died overnight at Fitzroy Australia Resources' Carborough Downs mine site.

"Industrial manslaughter, that's a must - it's non-negotiable," Mr Smyth said.

He also shut down a call by Shadow Mines Minister Dale Last for a parliamentary inquiry into mine safety.

"I respect the views of the pollies, they can say what they want … but it then becomes a political bunfight," Mr Smyth said.

CFMEU Mining and Energy Queensland district president Stephen Smyth.
CFMEU Mining and Energy Queensland district president Stephen Smyth.

"We don't want that, we want action now.

"(A parliamentary inquiry) gives the politicians an opportunity to get out there and throw mud at each other when miners are still being killed and hurt on the job."

While an investigation is already under way into the death of the mine worker at Carborough Downs mine, the CFMEU has called for industry and government to listen to its list of demands.

These involve the inclusion of the mining sector in industrial manslaughter laws, a review of the employment and training of mine site supervisors, and a revisit of the results from the industry-wide safety resets conducted earlier this year.

Mr Smyth confirmed Carborough Downs had completed its safety reset.

"We said from the outset that the safety reset was a good idea, but a one-off reset was not going to fix the behaviour and culture of companies," he said.

Mr Smyth offered his condolences to the mine worker's family, friends and work colleagues.

"It's more than tragic, it's just out of control," he said.



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