IT IS certainly a man's domain.

Gladstone Men's Shed Association Inc. is lined with tools and the handy work of it's 70-something members.

But secretary Ron Robertson said the shed was about more than boys and their toys.

He said it was an opportunity for men to continue socialising after their working days were done.

"When they retire ... they lose all contact with other men," Mr Robertson said.

He also said it was an opportunity for men to get some vital health advice with professionals coming to talk on a range of subjects including blood pressure, cancer and depression.

Although the shed has been operating since January, on Saturday it was officially opened by Gladstone Regional Council mayor Gail Sellers and state member for Gladstone Liz Cunningham.

Gladstone Men's Shed Association Inc. president Mark Robinson said it had been an excellent turnout.

"It's nice to see the wives and families come to see what their dads and grandads are doing in the shed," Mr Robinson said.

The family day included a sausage sizzle with attendees free to roam the shed and take a look at the spoils of the men's trade.

Mr Robinson said membership was growing with a number of people signing up at the opening.

 

The shed

  • A place for the men to tinker and socialise
  • The products made in the shed are donated, such as the magnetic whiteboards and fishing rods made for childcare centres
  • The shed is open for business Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9am-noon.
  • For now, the 70-odd members meet in the shed behind Lifeline at 25 Off St. It's the association's temporary home until the new digs on Moura Cres in Barney Point are built.


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