IF YOU happen to run into trouble on the water, you'll be in safe hands.

The Gladstone Volunteer Marine Rescue work hard to ensure the region's boating community remains safe.

On Sunday afternoon 10 new Volunteer Marine Rescue members attended a new member induction at the VMR shed opposite the Yacht Club.

The session was run by chief controller Jim Purcell, OAM.

"Today was about explaining to new members what they're entitled to with membership and some things to keep them safe," Mr Purcell said.

"We covered a range of topics from keeping safe in storms to navigation and radios."

Mr Purcell said the sessions are mainly about keeping people safe on the water.

"The Gladstone region is a very different area," he said.

"There are coral reefs that aren't visible at high tide that can make the water a lot more dangerous."

The Gladstone VMR is responsible for an area of 7000 square nautical miles.

It is staffed entirely by volunteers.

There are currently 140 active members.

"We average about two incidents every week," Mr Purcell said.

"Mainly people running out of fuel or breakdowns."

Mr Purcell said the Gladstone climate makes it difficult to keep volunteers.

"There are a lot of people coming and going in the area," he said.

"We could always use more."

New member inductions are held once every six weeks and offer something for everyone.

"We have experienced boaties attend who might be new to the area," Mr Purcell said.

"Everyone who attends comes away with something."



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