Britain's Kyle Edmund leaves the court after losing to Serbia's Novak Djokovic during their men's singles third round match on the sixth day of the 2018 Wimbledon Championships at The All England Lawn Tennis Club in Wimbledon, southwest London, on July 7, 2018. Djokovic won the match 4-6, 6-3, 6-2, 6-4. / AFP PHOTO / Glyn KIRK / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE
Britain's Kyle Edmund leaves the court after losing to Serbia's Novak Djokovic during their men's singles third round match on the sixth day of the 2018 Wimbledon Championships at The All England Lawn Tennis Club in Wimbledon, southwest London, on July 7, 2018. Djokovic won the match 4-6, 6-3, 6-2, 6-4. / AFP PHOTO / Glyn KIRK / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE

Wimbledon engulfed in never-ending cheat storm

THE c-word - cheating - has had quite an airing at Wimbledon over the past week.

Dominika Cibulkova has been at the centre of two separate integrity storms, one serious, the other trifling.

And Kyle Edmund's reputation - unfairly or not - will never be the same again after the double-bounce furore against Novak Djokovic.

Two of the three incidents underline why tennis needs to employ the Hawk-Eye replay system on a wider basis than it does now.

Had it been used to adjudicate how many times the ball bounced - it was twice - before Edmund speared the ball for a winner, Djokovic would be have been spared the vilification of a boorish crowd.

Umpire Jake Garner completely botched the situation.

The double bounce was followed by Edmund's sliding racquet touching the net and, worst of all, the Englishman's shot landed out but was not over-ruled because Djokovic was too late challenging.

Because he was too busy pointing out the disputed double bounce and the racquet's illegal collision with the net.

For his sins, Djokovic was jeered and booed by an infantile partisan crowd.

It says much about Djokovic that, despite the roughhouse treatment he endured, he unreservedly defended Edmund.

And he was right to do so.

As Edmund sprinted forward toward the ball, he had no idea where the contact point was.

Nor could he have been sure about where the ball landed, not that what happens on the other side of the net is any of his business.

Point is, he is now suspected of questionable tennis morals.

Dominika Cibulkova of Slovakia speaks to a match official after a line call during the women's singles match against Su-Wei Hsieh
Dominika Cibulkova of Slovakia speaks to a match official after a line call during the women's singles match against Su-Wei Hsieh

In Cibulkova's case, Monday's explosion against Hsieh Su-Wei was not so much surprising as inevitable.

Her refusal to play on until the supervisor was called to investigate umpire Juan Zhang's poor handling of an incorrect call and over-rule showed her in a negative light.

Cibulkova is, to use a tennis phrase, an "edgy competitor."

She so annoyed Johanna Konta with her thigh-slapping tactics when preparing to receive, the Englishwoman formally complained.

That Konta noticed is evidence of her wandering focus.

The attempt to claim a point she knew wasn't hers against Hseih falls into a different and more sinister category.

Which is why cheating was such a popular subject for discussion on "Manic Monday."



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