HEAVENS: Santa sits in a canoe in the overgrown Lake Clarendon, which has dried up in the drought. PHOTO: ALI KUCHEL / GATTON STAR.
HEAVENS: Santa sits in a canoe in the overgrown Lake Clarendon, which has dried up in the drought. PHOTO: ALI KUCHEL / GATTON STAR.

Keep the presents Santa, there’s something else we want

THERE'S one Christmas wish on every farmer's list this year - drought-breaking rain.

According to Lake Clarendon farmer Tim Linnan, it will take at least 300mm (12 inches) of rain to properly top up the dams and put a trickle in the creeks.

"We need a low to come in off the coast and give us a week's worth of rain," Mr Linnan said.

"Storms won't fix the dam and creek problems; all they do is cause damage."

He can't recall the farm's last decent rainfall, saying it would have been in the 2013 floods.

During last week's storm his property, Maragi Farms, recorded 10mm, enough to settle the dust.

CHRISTMAS WISH: Santa and Lake Clarendon vegetable grower Tim Linnan inspect the shallots prior to harvest and discuss the urgent need for rain. PHOTO: ALI KUCHEL.
CHRISTMAS WISH: Santa and Lake Clarendon vegetable grower Tim Linnan inspect the shallots prior to harvest and discuss the urgent need for rain. PHOTO: ALI KUCHEL.

The Linnans are double pumping water - meaning water is getting pumped into a dam before being re-pumped through the spray lines on to the crops.

"Unless you've got a super bore, it's pumped into the dams and back out because the volumes in the bores aren't good enough to run full spray lines anymore," he said.

Despite the lack of rain, Mr Linnan's shallot crops are looking a treat in time for Christmas - a time of the year where his production order nearly doubles.

It also means so does his production costs.

"All we want for Christmas is for good rain to set in," Mr Linnan said.

He said the situation could eased if water from Wivenhoe could be pipelined into what he described as Queensland's three "worst assets"

"We just need a politician to stand up and do something - put in a pipeline from Wivenhoe to give us an allocation," he said.

"These dams, Lake Clarendon, Atkinson Dam and Lake Dyer, are the three worsts assets in Queensland - and they can be fixed."

Until then, he will continue to pray for rain.



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