Jelly Kids' catchy tunes sure to put smiles on little faces

Jelly Kids in the studio: Toby Loveland, Heidi Loveland, Natasha Koch and Peter Schravemade. Photo Contributed
Jelly Kids in the studio: Toby Loveland, Heidi Loveland, Natasha Koch and Peter Schravemade. Photo Contributed Contributed

WHEN Heidi Loveland was at university as a teen, she never thought almost 16 years later she would be part of a kids band recording songs about chocolate, butterflies and the alphabet.

But the now mother-of-two is doing exactly that, and she wouldn't have it any other way.

"I would never go back to a real job," she says from her Brisbane home.

"It's a lovely thing to be able to do at this time in our lives - it's very organic."

Heidi is part of three-member band, Jelly Kids, the latest flavour in children's entertainment to hit the Australian music scene.

Heidi, a freelance music teacher, re-kindled forces with her friends Natasha Koch and Peter Schravemade at the end of 2012 after a large break from working together.

The three friends met as 17-year-olds in their first year of studying a music degree at QUT, sharing in common the fact there was a need for good quality children's tunes when doing a project on independent music.

"We very quickly cemented a great friendship and by the time we were working on the project in third year, we were inseparable," Heidi says.

"We realised there was a real gap for music for kids so we recorded stuff at uni and then shelved it for 15 years."

During that time, the trio pursued careers in various fields and had children of their own.

In 2012, Natasha, Peter and Heidi decided to form a band, taking it on as a "passion project" with the help of Heidi's husband and guitarist Toby.

When writing well-constructed songs it's nice to get a pat on the back sometimes.

Drawing influence from their personal music backgrounds, Jelly Kids labelled themselves as a traditional pop-rock band and got working, incorporating bass, guitar, keys and vocals in their first and second albums.

The band entered their song Alphabet Groove in The 2012 Queensland Music Awards and were pleasantly surprised when they found out they were finalists in the children's music category.

"We thought it was a fluke," Heidi laughs.

"We are now getting the industry nod.

"When writing well-constructed songs it's nice to get a pat on the back sometimes."

Their popularity is increasing, with kids and adults alike.

"It hasn't been hard to get work honestly, people are snapping it up," Heidi says.

"Through to Christmas we've got bookings - once people come and see you it just rolls."

The target audience is two to eight-year-olds and Heidi describes the band's style as a mix of reggae, rock, pop, jazz, funk, country, blues and folk layered with catchy lyrics.

The band's first album, Jelly, contains 11 songs with some cheeky lyrics and smooth harmonies.

Writing songs about clouds and eating spaghetti through a straw might sound easy, but it requires musical intelligence.

"Don't overestimate them (songs)," Heidi said.

"There's a fine line between action songs and word songs and a lot of thought goes into it."

Jelly Kids performs 45-minute shows and has appeared at various shopping centres, vacation care programs, discos, birthday parties and more around Brisbane.

Their next stop is the Agnes Blues and Roots Festival where they will be playing on Saturday, and are set to put smiles on little people's faces.

THE GIG



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