Investigations continue into vapour leak at QCLNG

WORKPLACE Health and Safety Queensland isn't revealing any details into their investigation over the vapour leak that was detected at QCLNG earlier this month.

In a statement sent to the Observer it said the vapour leak, which happened on March 19, was still being investigated, along with others at that site.

"There are many potential causes of a leak in a processing plant. The operator of a major hazard facility is required to identify all possible causes and implement controls that eliminate or reduce the risk as reasonably practical," the statement read.

"The terms gas and vapour are used interchangeably in some contexts, and generally refer to the form of the substance.

Bundaberg CQUniversity forensics laboratory lecturer David Skegg said companies working with liquefied natural gas should have a triple redundancy safety detectors.

"The one thing that people need to be conscious of is the inherent safety of design systems and detectors.

"The way its configured should have a redundancy if one gadget fails, another will pick it up," he said.

"For a very safe service you should get triple redundancy, so if a leak does occur, there are three systems in place to detect it," he said.

Mr Skegg said leaks can occur when LNG is being pumped through metal tanks.

He said the usual safety precautions is to stop work, and clear the area where the leak has occurred.

"You stop all workers so you reduce the possibility of ignition," he said.

Bechtel Gladstone general manager Kevin Berg said it was the first leak of its kind since the production of LNG on the project.



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