SWEAT IT OUT: Yaralla group fitness instructor and World Aerobics Champion Sandi Carmichael Heard.
SWEAT IT OUT: Yaralla group fitness instructor and World Aerobics Champion Sandi Carmichael Heard. Contributed

How listening to music can help you burn more calories

LISTENING to music can help people achieve their fitness goals, Gladstone sporting professionals say.

In the current age of technological advancement, it is rare to see a person out running without a set of headphones pressed firmly into their ears.

Whether they're sporting the newest style of earbuds or wearing a brand that's an oldie but a goodie, the average person prefers to work-out to their favourite jams.

But Yaralla group fitness instructor and World Aerobics Champion Sandi Heard said exercising to music goes way beyond mere preference.

 

SWEAT IT OUT: Yaralla group fitness instructor and World Aerobics Champion Sandi Carmichael Heard.
SWEAT IT OUT: Yaralla group fitness instructor and World Aerobics Champion Sandi Carmichael Heard. Contributed

She said listening to music had the power to influence a person's ability to push themselves harder, for longer and more regularly.

A study by The Sport Journal found during a tough workout, music could affect how a person felt.

This means while rocking out to a motivational song won't remove the physical pain a person may be feeling, it affects how they feel about the exertion.

Sandi said music brought "atmosphere, energy and a story" to a workout, which is why she brings tunes into a broad variety of group exercise classes.

"High-energy beats and passionate ballads bring out high amounts of energy and effort from both me as the instructor and the participants in front of me," she said.

"Instructors will use the highs and strong chorus of the music to get a spike of effort out of the participants. The music we use during the peak of a class is much more powerful than the music of a warm-up or a cool down."

According to Healthline, music's soundwaves turn into pulses or vibrations, which travel to different nerves in the brain. The pulses then influence a person's brain, which translates to the body's movement.

Translation? A person's body moves to the beat of the music they're rocking out to.

But Sandi said music does not just have a positive effect on those people pumping iron or exercising at high intensities.

She said the effect music has is not restricted to one kind of work-out which explained why in "classes such as yoga and body balance the music tells a different story than that of a high-energy class".

"Music is what makes group fitness so empowering and enjoyable. More than often the movement is done to the beat and speed of the music and without the music to drive us we wouldn't achieve anywhere near the energy effort as we do with it," Sandi said.

"I know that as an instructor and a lover of group fitness and movement done to music, I can feel the energy buzz and increased effort that comes out of me when I am connecting and enjoying the power of the music."

 

Anita Rienks is a Gladstone yoga teacher who plays music during her classes.
Anita Rienks is a Gladstone yoga teacher who plays music during her classes. Matt Taylor GLA080318YOGA

The Railway Shala, Gladstone yoga instructor Anita Rienks uses music as a valuable tool in her classes.

"Music allows the students to move at their own pace and depth for a known period of time (length of the song)," she told The Observer.

Anita said traditionally, yoga students moved on the teacher's instruction.

"I wanted to cater for the diversity of students in my class by allowing them to move to their own breath and at the intensity that suits their needs at the given time," she said.

 

Anita Rienks is a Gladstone yoga teacher who plays music during her classes.
Anita Rienks is a Gladstone yoga teacher who plays music during her classes. Matt Taylor GLA080318YOGA

"Some of the music is evocative and emotive creating a strong union between movement and mind. Other musical choices are strong and powerful to lift energy and inspire strength. The feedback from students is that the music overwhelmingly enhances their yoga experience."

What music does to your workout

1. Music can help motivate you to get your workout started.

2. Sweating up a storm can seem easier if you're doing it to your favourite song, meaning you could be working harder without realising it.

3. Listening to music can amp up your mood and boost the way you feel before, during and after you shred.

4. Exercising to the beat of a song encourages your body to move to a steady rhythm - coordinating your movements.

5. We all have that one song that gets us going no matter what. Turns out it can help you push yourself and breathe through your limits.



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