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Harbour report gets juicier with fish, mangrove health

RESULTS IN: CQUniversity professor and head of the Gladstone Healthy Harbour Partnership science panel John Rofle.
RESULTS IN: CQUniversity professor and head of the Gladstone Healthy Harbour Partnership science panel John Rofle. Tegan Annett

SCIENTISTS will comb through the mangroves at Gladstone this year, in one of the final two additions to the largest study on the Port City's harbour.

The Gladstone Healthy Harbour Partnership will add mangrove and fish health to the study this year following the release of its most comprehensive survey in three years on Tuesday night.

CQUniversity professor and head of the independent science panel John Rolfe said work had already started on the next survey, as the group searches for scientists to undertake the new surveys for fish and mangrove health.

"Next year we can stand here and say we have everything in the report card and exactly how healthy we are," he said.

Prof Rolfe said while water and sediment quality remained as the highest performers during 2017, the harbour's habitats remained a concern.

"The things we struggle with are in habitats, sea grass and corals which both scored a D ... largely because of the floods a few years ago...they're slowly recovering," he said.

The findings of the 2017 survey were launched with the backdrop of the Gladstone Harbour and a free cruise offered to community members and volunteers on Tuesday.

Gladstone Healthy Harbour Partnership chair Paul Birch said Gladstone's Harbour was looking "nice and healthy".

 

Gladstone Healthy Harbour Partnership chair Paul Birch during the release of the 2017 survey.
Gladstone Healthy Harbour Partnership chair Paul Birch during the release of the 2017 survey. Tegan Annett

"This report gives the community a true story of what goes on in the harbour," he said.

"There's a lot of rumours and innuendos that go on about this harbour, but this report card is one area where industry, government, community and science all agree on what is actually happening in the harbour."

The environment was graded a C, social was B, economic was B and the new cultural result was a C.

Gradings were calculated using 30 indicators from 99 different measures.

Topics:  environment gladstone harbour gladstone industry gladstone port



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