RAAF crew check out an EA-18G Growler after its arrival at RAAF Base Amberley, west of Brisbane.
RAAF crew check out an EA-18G Growler after its arrival at RAAF Base Amberley, west of Brisbane. DAVE HUNT

Growlers put e-defence in air

THE last of the RAAF's 12 EA-18G Growler electronic attack aircraft has arrived at RAAF Base Amberley outside Brisbane.

Number 6 Squadron formed 100 years ago in the First World War and now is the only group outside the US operating the world's most advanced electronic attack and defence aircraft.

The Growler is based on the F/A-18F Super Hornet that 6 Squadron has been flying for some years. The Growler is fitted with extra avionics, enhanced radio frequency receivers, a better communications suite and radio-frequency jamming pods to jam enemy systems.

Growlers are able to jam communications for enemy forces and when working in tandem can locate a signal from a mobile phone to allow its user to be targeted.

Australian Growlers have already held successful integration flights and weapon firings with RAAF F/A-18F Super Hornets and US Navy EA-18G Growlers as part of test and evaluation.

The RAAF plans to keep the Growler at the forefront of electronic attack capability throughout its service life.



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