Giant black 'snail trails' are good for the roads: Council

Gladstone Regional Council is assuring residents that the giant, black "snail trails" on local roads are not signs of an alien lifeform but are part of a road maintenance program.

Gladstone region Mayor Gail Sellers said the thin trails weaving along bitumen on numerous roads within the region indicate where cracks have been sealed in preparation for resurfacing.

"It is imperative that crack sealing and pavement repairs are undertaken prior to resurfacing works to ensure underlying pavement is protected and any defects do not reflect through, effecting the new asphalt overlay or bitumen resealing." Councillor Sellers said

"Crack sealing is an extremely economical way of maintaining pavements and is used worldwide to effectively protect and extend the life of roads." 

Cr Sellers said the cracks in pavements allow moisture to penetrate the surface causing cracking which can lead to potholes and eventually a major pavement breakdown, requiring expensive repairs.

"A hot-applied polymer modified bituminous sealant is used which is flexible enough to allow for expansion and contraction of the pavement," she said

"The current crack sealing operation is finished but future programs will be developed as required to ensure the structural integrity and longevity of the road network is maintained."



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