Former Ipswich Jets player escapes more jail time

A FORMER Ipswich Jets player has escaped more time in custody for extortion and drug supply.

Leslie Alovili, 22, was going to be sentenced to three years jail but he had already spent 12.5 months in custody that could not be declared.

Judge David Reid said he would reduce the sentence to two years, wholly suspended for four years, to take the time behind bars into account.

Alovili had previously been jailed for three years for causing grievous bodily harm to a Brisbane nightclub patron, who ended up in hospital with bleeding on the brain.

But the Queensland Court of Appeal overturned his conviction and acquitted him after reviewing the trial.

Brisbane District Court heard on Friday how Alovili threatened a man, 20, he claimed owed him money.

"I will find you and you know I'll kill you - you know I've got a gun and I have shot someone before," Alovili threatened.

Crown prosecutor Sandra Cupina said Alovili turned up at the man's house a month later on December 1, 2012, with a replica gun that was never found.

She said he told the victim's brother-in-law to let the victim know he had until Thursday and revealed a gun under his shirt.

Ms Cupina said Alovili was also caught with a "tick sheet" - a ledger of drug debts - as well as scales, methylamphetamines and a mobile phone with text messages about drugs.

She said 10 text messages related to methylamphetamine supply and the others to marijuana.

The court heard Alovili - who now lives in NSW and plays football for Maitland - was living with his father, had employment and was going to church.



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