For the love of saving wildlife support Safe Haven

FOR the first time, I saw a wombat up close, and I even gave the very cute Southern hairy nosed wombat, Wiggles, a pat.

And that was all it took for me to realise why the dedicated volunteers at Safe Haven take their breeding and research program so seriously.

The only way I had seen a wombat before was from behind a fence in a zoo.

And it's an unfortunate reality books might be the only place they may be seen in years to come.

The largest privately-owned breeding facility for these animals and bridled nail-tail wallabies is in the Gladstone region's backyard, and they are calling for help.

Whether it is food or cash donations or volunteers willing to put in the hard yards, they said it would be an immense help.

People take for granted the opportunities to visit zoos and see these types of animals.

I still remember when I was about three or four-years-old and I had my first experience at a zoo.

It was in Perth, and I thought it was amazing.

I spent most of the time gazing at the orangutans and monkeys, who appeared to be playing peek-a-boo among the trees in their enclosure.

I went back to the same zoo last year, and not much has changed since I was a little one, I was still amused by the monkeys and orangutans.

It's easy to help out Safe Haven.

They have applied for a grant of $5000 through the Sun Super Dreams competition, head to the website to cast your vote.

To vote for their dream, visit sunsuperdreams.com.au, click on the all dreams tab, sort dreams by category, select environment and click on Alyce's dream.

You can also visit Safe Haven - AACE on Facebook.



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