Extra-large Easter egg equals about 60 teaspoons of sugar

A SPOON full of sugar does not help the medicine go down. Nor do Easter eggs - not even the small ones.

Cancer Council Queensland spokesperson Katie Clift said even a small Easter egg could contain around 14 teaspoons of sugar - more than double the recommended six teaspoons daily.

"The Easter long weekend is a time to relax and enjoy with friends and family - we want Queenslanders to do that as healthily and happily as possible," Ms Clift said.

"Many parents wouldn't be aware that treating their kids to an extra-large Easter egg could mean treating them to an average of 60 teaspoons of sugar per egg!

"This is a warning for all Queenslanders to go easy on Easter treats this season - eating substantially more sugar than the recommended amount can have a serious health impact.

"Excess sugar consumption is a major cause of weight gain, which is a key risk factor for cancer."

The World Health Organisation recommends limiting sugar consumption from both food and drinks to no more than six teaspoons a day (about 25 grams) for optimum health.

One 250g milk chocolate bunny can contain around 35 teaspoons of sugar - which would take about three hours of running to burn off.

Just four small milk chocolate eggs can exceed the daily recommended sugar intake, and would take half an hour of running or 40 minutes of bike riding to burn off.

A 200g milk chocolate bunny with 28 teaspoons of sugar would take three hours of swimming to burn off.

"We're urging Queenslanders to check the labels on Easter treats and limit consumption this long weekend," Ms Clift said.

"For good health and happiness, think about alternative Easter gifts for your kids, encourage them to be physically active, and put on a healthy lunch for the family - you won't regret it!"

More information about Cancer Council Queensland, and ensuring a happy and healthy Easter, is available via 13 11 20 or cancerqld.org.au.

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