Cerebral Palsy League support work Kylee Hunter with Michelle Walters and Les Veber.
Cerebral Palsy League support work Kylee Hunter with Michelle Walters and Les Veber. Paul Braven

Disability training key to fixing local jobs crisis

THE key to fixing Gladstone's job crisis is an enrolment in disability training courses, according to Cerebral Palsy League Gladstone senior support carer Tracey Clifford.

A new round of training is starting on Tuesday and Ms Clifford is encouraging those who are jobless to invest in a new profession.

"It's definitely an option for those looking for work," Ms Clifford said.

"There's plenty of room for progression and a lot of areas to go into."

>> Looking for work? Check out the local jobs on offer here

Ms Clifford said the amount of work in the sector was going to steadily increase with the implementation of the Integrated National Disability Strategy next year.

"In the past the government have held funds and directed people with a disability to certain organisations that have space," she said.

"Now the INDS is giving everyone that has previously received funds freedom to pick and choose where they would like to go.

"This in turn is going to create 15,000 new jobs."

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Support worker Kylee Hunter has been in the industry for eight years and said it catered to all walks of life.

"Before disability, I was a checkout chick and then worked in cafes as a barista," she said.

"Personally, I had a job in disability even before I had gained my qualifications."

Ms Hunter said she was well equipped for the role after caring for her relatives.

"Mum had leukaemia and dad had dementia. Combined with me already being a mother meant I already had a lot of experience."

According to Ms Hunter the work would suit anyone, but preferably mothers or fit and able males.

"There's a lot of flexibility for families, which really suits a lot of people around town," she said.

"We're always looking for more staff, especially men because it can be physically demanding at times.

"But you've got to do it for the love, because the money isn't a lot."

For $199 a Certificate Three is available and more accessible than ever, with the course open to anyone 15 years of age or older who has finished secondary school.

"It's online so that really opens it up to people short on time and in remote locations," Ms Clifford said.

"There will be a physical lesson every couple of months at the Community Hub, where Brisbane officials will fly up to help with the theory."

Five people already have signed up with the Cerebral Palsy League Gladstone.



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