IN THE GARDEN: Kinberly Anderson, 10, learns about the environment.
IN THE GARDEN: Kinberly Anderson, 10, learns about the environment. Brenda Strong

Digging in for the future

STUDENTS from across the region from “Reef Guardian Schools” participated in the “Sustaining Biodiversity” Eco Challenge yesterday.

As yesterday was plant-a-tree day it made the event even more special for the kids.

Program manager Megan Sperring said this year encouraged students to become wetland ecologists and eventually be able to understand and explain different parts of the ecosystem.

“Students and teachers will explore the biodiversity of the Police Creek wetland ecosystem and look at what is there, why it is important, and who is responsible for it,” Ms Sperring said.

All children were so excited to be apart of the program and lapped up every minute of it.

Whether they were conducting fish trapping or planting trees the whole day was exciting.

Eleven-year-old Madelyn Smith loved the day and wanted to come back next year.

“We have been learning about the environment and why we shouldn’t pollute the creek,” Madelyn said.

“My favourite part was planting trees and fishing.”

This Sunday is community tree day, so the Eco Challenge has come at the perfect time.

Ms Sperring said that it was an important program and more than 60,000 students across Queensland participated in environmental projects.

“The key objective of the Reef Guardian Schools program is to create awareness, understanding and appreciation for the reef.”



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