Daylight saving plan: Create three time zones

A PROPOSAL to move clocks forward permanently by 30 minutes to lessen the impacts of daylight saving on the Tweed and other cross-border towns has received a mixed reaction.

Tweed State MP Geoff Provest said it was one of the few new ideas in a report by the Cross-Border Commissioner completed in September 2013 and now under consideration by Cabinet.

Under the proposal, which was put forward by the inaugural commissioner Steve Toms, daylight saving would be scrapped with the entire eastern seaboard operating on its own time-zone all year.

Mr Provest said it was bound to have its critics, like every idea that had been posed to fix the social and business impacts of daylight saving.

"The thing I like about it is it's a fresh idea," he said.

Another proposal previously mooted by Mr Provest, of placing Tweed Heads in a separate time zone to match Queensland, is also under consideration by Cabinet.

Mr Provest argues that with about 30% of the local workforce employed in Queensland and 12% of children being educated north of the border, it should remain on eastern standard time during summer months.

He said this week he still supported that plan, despite admitting to receiving calls of complaint to his office from constituents who support daylight saving.

"Queensland have made it quite clear they're not going to change," he said.

"Once Cabinet looks at it they'll make a response. I'd expect it in the next few months."

But the Deputy Premier Andrew Stoner said the government had no plans to change the current daylight saving provisions.

Shadow Minister for the North Coast Walt Secord said Mr Stoner's comment was a slap in the face to Mr Provest.

"His boss, the Deputy Premier Andrew Stoner, has ruled out his plan immediately," Mr Secord said.

Tweed ALP candidate Ron Goodman said local people wanted daylight saving to stay in place and for Queensland to "see the light" and fall in line with New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania and the Australian Capital Territory.

"That would be the most effective answer to solve the frustration on both sides of the border caused by different time zones," Mr Goodman said.

The stats

  • 14 million Australians in New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania and the ACT live under daylight saving


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