Cycling laws have positive effect on some drivers

NEARLY two months after a law requiring vehicles to leave one metre when passing cyclists took effect, a local cyclist says it's working - mostly.

Cycling enthusiast and Gladstone Bicycle Centre owner Dave McIntosh said he wanted to thank those Gladstone drivers who were not only passing at a greater distance, but were slowing down while they passed.

While the bike-mad Gladstonite was positive about the effect of the laws on safety, he said Gladstone drivers generally were lagging behind other cities in expressing courtesy to cyclists and passing at a safe distance.

"I've had a couple of close calls lately," said Mr McIntosh, who was nearly taken out by a truck on Hansen Rd two weeks ago.

"They still don't all understand they actually have to slow down and give you a metre," he said.

"Down in Brisbane, people have really caught on."

Mornings are the most dangerous time to ride a bike in Gladstone, according to Mr McIntosh.

"Some of these guys are in such a hurry to get to work and they're not realising."

He said a lot of cyclists stopped riding in Gladstone because of fears for their safety.

"A lot of people gave up on bike riding in Gladstone, because they reckon the traffic was too bad," he said.

Mr McIntosh, a member of the 100-member Port Curtis Bicycle Users Group, said he hoped more Gladstone drivers would slow down as the law on passing cyclists was enforced.



UPDATE: Man airlifted after truck rollover in region

UPDATE: Man airlifted after truck rollover in region

A RESCUE helicopter is airlifting a male after a truck roll over

Clinton land owner's plea to flood-proof after $80k spend

Clinton land owner's plea to flood-proof after $80k spend

Industrial land owner reaches to council, department for help.

How a Kirkwood mum is sewing a fashion empire in her garage

How a Kirkwood mum is sewing a fashion empire in her garage

Gladstone boutique, Lorraine and Blair is taking off.

Local Partners