Cyber crime is on rise in regional areas

REGIONAL communities are some of the hardest hit by cyber crime and identity theft.

Hoping to change this trend through a series of education sessions are Australian Cyber Security Network advocate Dr Sally Ernst (pictured, inset) and co-worker Mel Messina.

The pair is spending two months travelling to rural communities and speaking to business leaders about the challenges of 21st century trading.

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Yesterday they spoke to GAPDL's Glenn Churchill, deputy mayor Matt Burnett and Gladstone librarian Sue Norris.

"Your small business has taken blood, sweat and years to get going," she said.

"It's that one moment to identify, do we click on this link? Do we open this attachment? Do we transfer this money? We've got a lot of challenges on our hands."

Ms Ernst said there was a lot of information out there but her goal was to have business leaders engaged, comfortable and supported.

"You may not think your business is big enough to warrant being targeted but whether or not they are in it for your clients or monetary value, these (assets) can go further in another nation's economy," she said.

"Gladstone in particular has large resources, that once infiltrated, could cause long-term damage and have a flow-on affect globally."

The company will return later this year.



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