SCIENCE AND CREATIVITY: Andrew Cameron shows an audience member how to make the perfect cocktail during one of his workshops.
SCIENCE AND CREATIVITY: Andrew Cameron shows an audience member how to make the perfect cocktail during one of his workshops. Contributed

Science of cocktails revealed in workshop

ANYONE can make a cocktail, says cocktail scientist and microbiologist Andrew Cameron .

"You search for a good story then choose relevant ingredients that help solidify that story," he said.

"Everything else is understanding how to balance the drink, how to get the flavours to behave, and sit the way we want.

"Sweetness, sourness, temperature, bitterness, alcohol consent - then you can look at what sort of drinking vessel you want to use and how to enhance the aroma and its visual presence through garnishes."

Mr Cameron said if you know how to make a tasty pasta or a curry, you should be able to blend a delicious drink in no time.

"It's all about having a flavour map in your mind and working out how to tweak the ratios to make it taste its best."

Mr Cameron will be in Toowoomba this weekend running a workshop that will teach cocktail lovers about the science behind creating alcoholic beverages, how it interacts with the body, and how to minimise a hangover.

Mr Cameron said he had always been a scientist, curious and doing his own experiments from a young age.

"Working within hospitality while studying, I quickly realised I could do more experiments within a kitchen or a bar, so I changed my major to microbiology which gave me a more in-depth understanding of the hidden world around and in us," he said.

"Since then I have been a strong advocate of getting people excited about the science and history behind what we consume."

He said although he was a scientist, he was a creative person first.

"I cannot draw or paint, but I find the complex nature of flavour a creative outlet," he said.

Mr Cameron said the first recorded use of the word as an alcoholic beverage dates back to the May 13 edition of The Balance and Columbian Repository, 1806 - in Hudson, New York.

"We've been blending drinks for awhile and every decade over the last century has definitely left a mark - from Prohibition, to the Tiki era, to the loud 80's, to molecular, to today."

 

CHEMISTRY OF COCKTAILS

  • Discover the science behind your favourite cocktails at Cobb & Co Museum on Saturday , from 5.30pm to 7.30pm.
  • Cost: $20 per person, includes two free cocktails.
  • For details or to book, visit http://www.cobbandco.qm.gov.au.

 

ANDREW'S FAVOURITE DRINK

  •  Equal parts: Mezcal, cynar and sweet vermouth, stirred and strained over ice in a short glass with an orange twist.
  • Andrew describes it as "smoky, bitter and complex".
  • He said he's yet to settle on the right name for it, as it is a drink that has Italian and Mexican components, and draws on a classic Negroni.


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