TROLLEY FOLLY: Ipswich City Council has had to remove piles of shopping trolleys, tyres and other debris from Bundamba Creek over the years.
TROLLEY FOLLY: Ipswich City Council has had to remove piles of shopping trolleys, tyres and other debris from Bundamba Creek over the years. File

Council plays tough cop over rogue trolley laws

THE battle to rid the city of rogue shopping trolleys continues to be a key focus for Ipswich City Council.

The council has introduced a local law that means shopping centres with 20 or more shopping trolleys will be fined for not keeping them under lock and key.

The aim was to finally rid the city of abandoned shopping trolleys on the streets and in rivers, creeks and other waterways.

Last year, Ipswich became the first city in Queensland requiring supermarkets and other retailers to implement an automatic wheel lock system on shopping trolleys.

Now, the council has shown it won't yield on its stance after Cr Andrew Antoniolli said two companies asked for exemptions.

"We've had two companies come to us - Bunnings and Aldi - asking for an exemption and I'm proud to say this council has held firm," Cr Antoniolli said.

"Because when we recently did a clean-up of Bundamba Creek, particularly, and some of those companies, it was their shopping trolleys that were found blocking those creeks."

He said he wanted to recognise the efforts of Cr Paul Tully who was adamant Ipswich should lead the way in trolley containment. 

"Shopping trolleys do cause a problem," he said.

"Shopping centres and companies like Woolworths and Coles have over the years been very lax in their security of shopping trolleys and we introduced last year a local law that, if a shop has 20 or more shopping trolleys, it has to provide a containment system."

The containment system required by Ipswich City Council will ensure that shopping trolleys stay inside shopping centres.

A wheel-locking mechanism automatically locks on the trolleys' wheels if taken outside the shopping precinct and can only be unlocked by the retailer.

The new local law regarding shopping trolleys comes into effect on July 1. Retailers failing to comply with the new system face fines of up to $5500.

The wheel lock system is used by Coles at Riverlink and the company says it has worked.



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