SLOW TO ACT: Kevin Blessington is frustrated that the council didn’t fix this problem sooner.
SLOW TO ACT: Kevin Blessington is frustrated that the council didn’t fix this problem sooner. Mike Richards GLA050214BOYN

Residents frustrated as car park feels erosion onslaught

FLOODS and king tides have caused the car park at Wyndham Park in Boyne Island to start breaking up.

After repeatedly informing the Gladstone Regional Council of this problem, Boyne Island resident Kevin Blessington is frustrated they haven't fixed it sooner.

"On May 23, 2013, I phoned the council and reported serious erosion along the riverbank and car park," Mr Blessington explained.

"And I met Matt Burnett on May 30 at a meet the councillors function at Tanyella; afterwards we walked along the beach and I showed him the damage."

The GRC's response has been less than satisfactory, according to Mr Blessington.

"The first council reply was 'nothing is to be done in the short term, in the long term engineers will provide a shoreline erosion management plan'," he said.

"After speaking to Matt, the council feedback was 'engineers have decided to do nothing as the sand will move north to south'."

However, he said, four months ago the GRC dumped sand along the bank to improve the situation.

"The council turned up with tip trucks and tipped sand out here all along the beach, which was washed away at the first high tide. It was a complete and utter waste of money," he said.

"It also gave 4WD drivers illegal access to the beach until the high tide washed the sand away.

"The council made up signs that said 'No unauthorised vehicles allowed on beach' - which were washed away over the weekend."

Mr Blessington believes that at this point in time about 25m of river bank has eroded with some high tides causing up to 150 millimetres to be washed away.

The Boyne River shoreline was popular with Gladstone locals for easy access to a dog beach and a shower.

Building a small rock wall between the beach and Boyne Island would kill two birds with one stone, he said.

"All of these council assets and the houses in between would be protected by a rock wall, which could incorporate steps and handicapped access," he said.

Kind tides

  • Thursday, January 30, - high tide reached 4.70m
  • Friday, January 31, - high tide reached 4.77m
  • Saturday, February 1, - high tide reached 4.73m

Drainage on the agenda

MAYOR Gail Sellers has confirmed the council will fix the car park and solve any drainage problems.

This problem will be fixed in the coming weeks.

"The two works will be funded as part of the Queensland Reconstruction Authority's Natural Disaster Relief and Recovery Arrangements funded projects," she said.

"The council has spoken with residents in the past about their concerns and has been awaiting the release of its draft Shoreline Erosion Management Plan, which is a blueprint for future management of the shoreline, before making decisions as to the future of the shoreline along the Boyne River."

This project is designed to not only manage the shoreline but also the impacts on Boyne Island residents.

"Council is also in the process of seeking relevant approvals to implement temporary erosion control measures along the foreshore to reduce further damage until a more permanent solution can be found," she said.

Once the approvals are in place the council intends to discuss options for further erosion control and management with the affected Boyne Island esplanade residents.

A photo taken on February 1 showing the damaging king tide, wind and rain at the mouth of the Boyne River, Boyne Island.
A photo taken on February 1 showing the damaging king tide, wind and rain at the mouth of the Boyne River, Boyne Island. Luka Kauzlaric


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